Saturday, 31 May 2014

Homographs are words of like spelling but with more than one meaning.

The ash was reduced to ash. M'reen

Homographs are words of like spelling but with more than one meaning.                                               A homograph that is also pronounced differently is a heteronym.

 You think English is easy??
 I think a retired English teacher was bored...THIS IS GREAT!

 Read all the way to the end.................
 This took a lot of work to put together!

 1) The bandage was wound around the wound.

2) The farm was used to produce produce.

 3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.

 4) We must polish the Polish furniture.

 5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.

 6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.

 7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time to present the present.

 8) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.

 9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

 10) I did not object to the object.

 11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

 12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.

 13) They were too close to the door to close it.

 14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

 15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

 16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.

 17) The wind was too strong to wind the sail.

 18) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear.

 19) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

 20) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?

I'm sorry but I can't credit this as it was sent to me by a friend 
who is aware of my interest in reading.

Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?
Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com         gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               which takes advantage of the experience and expertise of others.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com         just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Wednesday, 28 May 2014

What is and is not reasonable regarding memory and recall.

The river Cam, Cambridge UK. M'reen

What is and is not reasonable regarding memory and recall.
written by M'reen

I think this depends on where you are coming from and where you expect to get to
and what you are prepared to do to get there.

I know someone who is 73 and spent his working life as a shop assistant with the long term hobbies
of photography, local history and painting and also in giving presentations about local history.
Looking at this list, these hobbies require examining the small detail on the page
and to give a talk requires a good memory of your subject which I think is easy if it is your joy.
However, he has always read a 200-300 page book in half an hour and remembers the detail
of what he has read as tested out point by point by his disbelieving son.

I know of a business man with a phenomenal recall for facts and figures
he dedicates a physical area – a rather nice hotel, and he dedicates a time period for his reading.
And he has honed his reading and retention skills.

Another business person who is quite dyslexic and finds reading to be very difficult
has a mobile app to convert text into voice.
His principal reading strategy is to find a key word intuitively and then research it on youtube.

I have been skirting around the issue of reasonable and unreasonable expectations regarding TCR
for some time. I’ve experienced some unreasonable expectations as have others.
We’ve expected TCR to do the learning for us when unless you are like my first friend
you have to put in a little effort to remember as well as the other two people described.

I can only discuss this subject from my own experience that I know mirrors that of others,
however, I have to leave their detailed experiences aside.

After pouring all the written material into my innermind
I expected to recall it simply because I’d told my mind to remember it.
But Turbo Charged Reading is not instant understanding, learning and recall
it is reading in a way that enables enhanced understanding, learning and recall
in a previously unfamiliar area.

I have had the following experience many times:
I slow read Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
and as is my practice with books I regard as text books I made notes on the pages.
Three years later I slow read this book again
and found that now I lived what I had previously only understood.
Therefore my subsequent reading and life experiences had ‘caught up’ with these concepts.
But I can’t quote or use these concepts directly in a conversation or essay
but I can express them as my collected attitudes. (spontaneous recall)
Is it important for me to be able to quote authors or concepts?
To be honest no it isn’t nor has it been important for me
though I do think that people who can sound to be so very intelligent and therefore an authority.
Had I been able to TCR in those far off days I would have read far more books
and in a wider area of interest
and so would have developed my personality and a wider talent range far sooner.
Even though I have the same intellectual range my exam results would have been easier to achieve, and with a better writing style and with greater content
And these benefits could have tipped me over into being accepted in the right junior school,
the right six form college, the right university
and an entirely different life path.

Back to what is and is not reasonable
In relation to graphs, lists, diagrams, formulae and the Highway Code, etc.
Regarding the Highway Code, the last time I tried to get to grips with this
I was unable to understand the difference between 3 sorts of xxxxxxxxxx
I asked a small number of people who also drive and found they were equally unknowledgeable.
However, practically, our safe driving outcome was the same
but from a slow reading and learning point of view I simply gave up.
Similarly I’ve been TCR books that have ancient Egyptian, Indian and English names.
My first level purpose was to remember the names of the principal characters 
and their position which would automatically lead to their actions.
My problems were 1) I couldn’t attempt to pronounce these names in my head and
2) didn’t make a concentrated effort to create my own pronunciation and
3) didn’t establish my memory of these names.
 I’ve recently found that (some) dyslexic people don’t ‘hear’ words correctly
which goes a long way to explain my creative spelling.

1)      I couldn’t attempt to pronounce certain names or words in my head.
Like many people I skim-passed words I don’t understand or cannot hear in my head.
As an aside, in my own writing I will sometimes make up a word,
as in context, the sound of that word carries my intention of meaning.
Someone questioned one of my made-up words and found that Spike Milligan
had created the same word and that it carried my intended meaning.
However, I didn’t listen to Spike Milligan during the time period of his Goons shows.
In much the same way I thought that an author was creating ‘sound’ words
until I looked up his extensive range of adjectives and found that my scenic understanding
of the word used had been created by his sentences and style.
I understand and can use many words in my reading or in my internal conversations
but I could not give a definition of these words
and also I have never had reason to vocalise these words
so when I finally get the opportunity I often mispronounce them to the amusement of the listener.
Therefore, rather like the Highway Code while I had a full understanding of the practical situation
I would not be able to ‘pass a test’ due to the fact that I could not describe the situation.
This was because I’d not taken my learning and recall 
to the levels beyond the basic level of understanding.
As you will recall from personal experience when learning any skill or subject
understanding, learning, memory and recall are built up in subsequent layers.

A solution to increase my word power would be to TCR a relevant dictionary
which not only gives the spelling and meaning but also a key to pronunciation.
So much so that a person learning a language did not realise that
he had confidently ordered his meal in the language of the country he was visiting.

2)      I didn’t make a concentrated effort to create my own pronunciation of new words.
TCR is reading
and reading assists many aspects of learning and learning and memory are developed in layers.
TCR is not suddenly developing a photographic memory or in this case a linked auditory memory.
Regarding foreign names in a story.
I did begin to recognise the shape of the different names that were written
and I associated these shaped words to the characters in the story.
This is rather like a child who recognises a thumb print or bent corner on a flash card
and produces the ‘right’ answer when the card is flashed before his vision.
The teacher then assumes that the child has learned to recognise and vocalise that word
and so can do so when that print is seen in a different situation!
Back to foreign names and English pronunciation; I didn’t take responsibility for my own progress.
I understood the story (level 1)
but I could not ascribe various events to the correct personage (level 2)
Did I want level 2 or had my purpose for reading been served at the stage of level 1
when I could then put the book down and get on with something else?
I could have used some memory skills; I could have become familiar with the spelling of the word – 
for me this is an easy skill which I shall outline at some point.
Christine Davis is easy for me and I just need to link her name to an event or character.
While I could easily remember the story around Vibia Perpetua
and the name looks easy because I can pronounce it in my head
I had to actively break the sounds down in order to create an aural and visual memory.
But the Indian names such as Vatsyayana and Chanakya and Meluhhan flagged up
my skim-passed quickly skills so I’d need to become comfortable with these words
before I could remember them.
Interestingly the simple act of breaking them down into syllables
and highlighting the alternate syllables has made these names far more approachable
and that has only taken a few realistic seconds.
However, unless I take steps to take this learning to the next level
these tender young shoots will wither away due to lack of attention.

3)      I didn’t establish my memory of these names.
While I am a TCR, these days I am a slow learner ;)
I had spent time learning to pronounce my version of a North African Roman name
and now. without checking I can ‘see’ her name in my mind map
and the information is beginning to fill in the specific spaces satisfactorily. 
Previously I could only remember that her name began with P and was quite long
and I almost have its rhythm, also that her slave’s name was short
and one of the bad guy’s had a name that was amusing with a rather rude ending.
             Is that sufficient for my purpose?  
Actually, no in some respects and yes in others as my principal purpose (level 1)
was to experience and record the progression of becoming a proficient TCR
but my personal purpose (level 2) was to be able to accommodate the information in the book
at a higher level than that of a general discussion.
In order to gain that higher level
I could recognise that I had the story firmly fixed in my mind and memory
as I could re-create my mind maps in my memory
and then I could actively learn the various names in order to pass a test.
I could use whatever learning techniques appeal to me
and would naturally TCR the results thus making my learning, memory and recall efficient.

I hope that the above covers understanding, learning, memory and recall
and that the responsibility of confirming that the understanding of:
names, dates, words and other such information is exactly the same
as if you were slow reading a book and expected to recall
and use that information at the level you require.
With the exception that when TCR your speed of reading, your understanding and memory
Is greatly enhanced and therefore when you come to remembering more at a higher level
that this is achievable with far less effort and time involvement.

TCR is part of the process that will make the further learning layers significantly easier
but it is not magically the whole process.
When I was studying intensively I took a computer based course and completed it in three days
and then found out that people generally took a number of weeks.
I think you will readily accept that if you do not maintain that level of intense study
then you would find yourself belonging to that general population.

Similarly even those with a natural high reading and memory ability
will find the following example to be pretty amazing
and yet it is only an extension of what they can do
but probably never have had the need to
or awareness of the possibility of such an achievement.
A PhD student poured 20,000 pages into his innermind during the course of one week,
his innermind then took a further week to catalogue this material,
cross reference it with the information he already had
and collated the specific material he needed
to complete his theses by the end of week three.
This was not magic but practice and not being limited by expectations.
Other PhD students take six to nine months to accomplish this feat
but while having the same or greater ability than the guy described;
they wouldn’t have the physical ability to turn that many pages,
to maintain the focused state of learning, or be able to maintain the specific use their eyes muscles. Nor would they have the assurance that the information was in there
and that they would be able to recall exactly what was needed
and just what was needed when required.
P.S. they would be familiar with the terms, language and concepts of the subject.

Therefore, I think it is somewhat unreasonable to expect to retain diagrams etc
that are outside of your professional or interest range after accessing the material one or two times.
A diagram or any other figurative representation is a different form of mind map
that requires your understanding of the material represented
and how you relate to that information
and not simply your understanding of the words and concepts.
Mind maps work for most people and are generally
the last level of understanding and memory for a particular book, conference or conversation.
I can only make a mind map with the understanding of the points I wish to remember.
Points I want to explore further need another level of comprehension
before they reach a level of comfortable knowledge and memory.
In order to pass an exam I then have to learn the Mind map in question and this is enhanced by TCR the original material and/or the mind map repeatedly.
You might be interested in following this pre-course and study link.
OR.
I could recognise that my expectations have been somewhat unrealistic that I don’t TCR a text,
understand its contents and then magically expect to remember it verbatim.
That I store the information in my innermind in smaller sequential steps
making sure that, if necessary, I employ practical learning skills regarding e.g. names
possibly finding it useful to make mini mind maps of each level of understanding and recall
until my familiarity with that new area is as confident as it is in my professional area.
OR
My continued TCR practice ensures that my learning and retention ability increases
just like an exercised muscle or practiced skill from wobbling to professional ability.

P.S I don’t ever anticipate TCR 20,000 pages in a week.
The point of TCR is to read efficiently to the level that is wanted – now.
With any leftover information stored in your innermind for spontaneous recall.
You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneous recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?
Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com         gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               which takes advantage of the experience and expertise of others.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com         just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Saturday, 24 May 2014

Success Level 2 of Turbo Charged Reading

Success Level 2 of Turbo Charged Reading has been well received by the guinea pigs.
Making the youtubes is something of a hoot.
Written By M'reen


Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?
Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com         gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               which takes advantage of the experience and expertise of others.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com         just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Wednesday, 21 May 2014

The 30 Second Habit with a Lifelong Impact



The 30 Second Habit with a Lifelong Impact

What follows is a beautiful Essentialist practice in a gorgeous piece written by my friend Robyn Scott
(one of WIRED's 50 People About to Change the World). Enjoy.

There are no quick fixes. I know this as a social science junkie, who’s read endless books and blogs on the subject, and tried out much of the advice — mostly to no avail.
So I do not entitle this post lightly.
And I write it only having become convinced, after several months of experimentation,
that one of the simplest pieces of advice I’ve heard is also one of the best.
It is not from a best selling book — indeed no publisher would want it: even the most eloquent management thinker would struggle to spin a whole book around it. Nor is it born out 
of our world of digital excess and discontent. Instead, it was given by a man born in the 19th century, to his teenage grandson, today in his fifth decade.

The man in question, an √©minence grise of the business world, is one of the most interesting people 
I have ever met. He has helped devise brands that are household names. These days, working only when he feels he has something to offer, he is parachuted in to solve stock price threatening corporate crises. Occasionally, when he’s sufficiently interested, he pens speeches for Fortune 500 CEOs and politicians, his words billed out at six figures. He is exceptionally well read, and also writes prolifically. Novels. But just for fun: on completion, he destroys them. He does not see the point 
in being published, or of seeking publicity in general. Amongst his friends are some of the most powerful people on the planet — from business leaders, to politicians, actors and other luminaries 
of the arts. But Google him, and you will find barely a ripple on the cyber seas.

I met him first over a coffee in his apartment, to discuss the strategy for a highly political non-profit working in Africa. Around his table sat an eclectic mix of very vocal people. Our host, making 
the coffee, said almost nothing. But on the few occasions he did interject, with a brief question 
or observation, it invariably clarified exactly what mattered— politely sweeping away the sludge 
of opinion that clogs such discussions. It was masterful: like watching a conductor of the London Philharmonic coaxing a small town student orchestra into shape.
So when he shared some of the best advice he’d ever received, I was captivated.
If you only do one thing, do this

He was in his early teens, about to start senior school, when his grandfather took him aside 
and told him the following:
Immediately after every lecture, meeting, or any significant experience, take 30 seconds — no more, no less — to write down the most important points. If you always do just this, said his grandfather, 
and even if you only do this, with no other revision, you will be okay.
He did, and he was. In everything he has done since, with such accomplishment, and with enough room still to experience life so richly. He later inducted into the pact both his sons, 
who have excelled in their young careers.

I’ve been trying it out for a few months. Here’s what I’ve found so far:

1. It’s not note taking: Don’t think, just because you write down everything in a meeting, 
that you’re excused from the 30 second summation. Though brief, this exercise is entirely different from taking notes. It’s an act of interpretation, prioritisation and decision-making.

2. It’s hard work: Deciding what’s most important is exhausting. It’s amazing how easy it is to tell yourself you’ve captured everything that matters, to find excuses to avoid this brief mental sprint — 
a kind of 100 metres for your brain.

3. Detail is a trap: Precisely because we so often, ostensibly, capture everything, we avoid the hard work of deciding what few things count. So much of excellence is, of course, the art of elimination. And the 30 second review stops you using quantity as an excuse.

4. You must act quickly: If you wait a few hours, you may recall the facts, but you lose the nuance.

5. And this makes all the difference in deciding what matters. Whether it’s the tone in someone’s voice, or the way one seemingly simple suggestion sparks so many others, or the shadow of an idea in your mind triggered by a passing comment.

6. You learn to listen better, and ask better questions: Once you get into the habit of the 30 second review, it starts to change the way you pay attention, whether listening to a talk or participating 
in a discussion. It’s like learning to detect a simple melody amidst a cacophony of sound. 
And as you listen with more focus, and ask better questions which prompt actionable answers, 
so your 30 second review becomes more useful.

7. You’re able to help others more: Much of what makes the 30 second cut are observations about what matters to other people. Even if the purpose is to help better manage different interests in future conversations, it also helps you understand others’ needs, and so solve their problems. This does not surprise me: in months of interviewing people who make generous connections, I’ve been struck by how many have their own unconscious version of the 30 second review: focused on the question of how best they can help.

8. It gets easier and more valuable: Each time you practice, it gets a little easier, a little more helpful, and little more fun.

htttp://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140401132614-8353952-the-30-second-habit-with-a-lifelong-impact?trk=tod-posts-post1-ptlt

I include this article because Turbo Charged Reading does not stand alone but is part of the skills
you use in life. The above article is excellent for many reasons and I‘d like to point out to TCRs:

1 It’s an act of interpretation, prioritisation and decision-making.

2 this brief mental sprint — a kind of 100 metres for your brain.

3 the art of elimination. ….. stops you using quantity as an excuse.

4 but you lose the nuance.

5 it’s the tone in someone’s voice, 
   or the shadow of an idea in your mind triggered by a passing comment.

6 you listen with more focus, and ask better questions which prompt actionable answers

7 focused on the question of how best they can help.

8 it gets a little easier, a little more helpful, and little more fun.

Each of these points is worth an article of their own from whatever your perspective.

Turbo Charged Reading: Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com         gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               which takes advantage of the experience and expertise of others.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com        just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Saturday, 17 May 2014

Habit - the Devil-you-know.

The Devil-you-know is a good and constant friend. M'reen

The following article has been added to from the point of view of a Turbo Charged Reader.
As a slow reader I read the article from top to bottom taking in every single word. M'reen
I understand what is being said and how it might benefit me and if I could adopt the practices recommended and then I get on with my day and as those thoughts are not established they wither away 
like un-watered seedlings.
As a TCR I take the full article into my innermind in a couple of seconds after first preparing my body 
and mind to accomplish this natural task. I have instructed my mind to filter out and retain
what is important to my purpose at this time. This is to highlight how the TCR tuition programme 
is designed to avoid the problems and enhance the benefits of habit and willpower. 
Next time I access this written information from my innermind store I might want 
an entirely different outcome/purpose.
You will note that the information that serves my purpose (in black) is only a small percentage of the whole and that that percentage would be easily reduced as I’ve left some for your understanding.
Therefore I don’t need to waste the time and (draining) energy to ‘take in’ and retain this superfluous information. Generally only 4-11% of a text is relevant the rest being supportive material or bumph.
At the end of the article I shall itemise how TCR achieves these aims – but will you still have the time 
to slow read? If not – then jump straight to the end of this article.


“If you conquer yourself, then you conquer the world” Paulo Coelho
It’s true that you can’t change other people, but you can change yourself - by taking control. Better still, self-control is a proven and significant key to success. Let’s see how you can develop your own self-control even further, through understanding and using two key ingredients: willpower and habit – providing an incredible way to free yourself, and be more successful at the same time. Many of us are constrained by our habits and a certain degree of lack of self control. Whether it’s in the realms of actively exercising regularly, resisting another chocolate bar, the way we deal with emails, or high level decision-making, better self-control can boost our productivity, improve our health, make us more money, and even lengthen our lives! Utilising self-control means realizing and displaying your inner power – whereas lack of self-control is a weakness.
If you want to succeed – take control of your self control! There is a direct connection between self-control and success, as extensive long-term research proves, and using this knowledge to your advantage can turbo charge your own success.
In the ’60s, Mischel, a sociologist, conducted an experiment to see if young children could resist instant gratification. He offered them the choice of having one marshmallow now, or two marshmallows if they could wait 15 minutes. Many chose instant gratification rather than exerting the willpower to wait. Years later, he tracked down some of the children, and discovered something startling. Those with high self-control – those who had held out for two marshmallows – grew into healthier, happier and wealthier adults. Those with low willpower did less well academically (despite having similar IQs). They were more likely to be in low-paying jobs, have fewer savings, were more overweight, more likely to have drug or alcohol problems, and had difficulty maintaining relationships. They were also almost 400% more likely to have a criminal conviction. These results were confirmed by a similar experiment in New Zealand reported by psychologist Roy F. Baumeister, who concluded that "Willpower is one of the most important predictors of success in life."
Where are you good at exerting self-control? Where - or when - does your willpower fail you?
Here are 4 ideas to help boost your understanding and practice of self-control, willpower and habit - and therefore take your success to another level:
1.                   Treat Willpower Like a Muscle
Willpower - the ability to resist temptation and restrain our impulses - is the most important factor in achieving a successful and happy life. It is more significant than money, intelligence, looks, or background. It helps to consider that willpower is like a muscle that can be trained and strengthened with practice and improved over time. Even exercising small acts of willpower, like sitting up straight, can pay off by reinforcing longer-term self-control in other activities. Also like a muscle, willpower can get tired if you overuse it. Exercising willpower, making choices or decisions and taking the initiative, all use up the same sort of energy. The more decisions we make, the weaker our willpower can become. Willpower is also similar to a muscle, in that when its strength depletes, it can be revived with glucose - as has been evidenced in research. As we all know, a sugar rush is not a good option, so it’s best to eat healthy food regularly to maintain blood sugar levels. Sleeping and eating well - planning for the slow-release burning of healthy calories - are most important. The impact of this phenomenon can have extreme consequences. A famous Israeli study in 2011, discovered that judges making decisions whether or not to grant parole did so early in the morning, in roughly 65% of cases after lunch, and hardly ever just before. Research shows that self-control has a physical basis and is affected by eating and sleeping - and that significant decisions you make can vary depending on whether they’re made in the morning or evening, and before or after a snack. What changes will you make to develop your willpower muscle?
What changes do you need to make, to prevent your willpower muscle from tiring?
2.                   Be Aware of Decision fatigue
Making decisions can actually exhaust your ‘stores’ of willpower. Psychologist Roy F Baumeister’s practical experiments asked people to make small decisions, followed by tests of willpower (which proved to be weakened). This demonstrated that there is a finite store of mental energy for exerting self-control. In essence, making choices saps willpower   - a condition termed ‘decision fatigue’. Use this knowledge to help you conserve your own self-control and use it most effectively. Resistance to making decisions arises from a fear of reducing options. To those decision-weary judges in the Israeli research, denying parole is easier - it maintains the status quo and prevents a potentially risky parolee committing crime again - but it also leaves more options open:   the judge can still release the prisoner at a future date. This is not necessarily the best option   - just the easiest and safest. Better to make good decisions with a fresh mind, now that we know the effects. Where there are fewer decisions to be made, there is less decision fatigue. These days, there are so many choices to make, especially in the working day. It’s easy to underestimate just how tiring it is to make any kind of decision - whether big or small, they all add up. Choosing what to have for breakfast, which task to do first, how much to spend - all deplete willpower. The cumulative effect can pay its toll. When willpower weakens (or is used up) our impulses to drink, eat, spend, and say silly things are stronger. And like the depleted parole judges, we become inclined to take the easiest option, even though that may not be the best choice.
“The best decision makers,” Baumeister says, “are the ones who know when not to trust themselves.”
Baumeister’s studies show that people with the best self-control are those who structure their lives in order to conserve their willpower. They don’t fill their days with back-to-back meetings. They maintain habits that eliminate too many choices. Zuckerberg, inventor of Facebook, wears the same outfit every day. President Obama wears either a blue or grey suit. Instead of making a decision each morning whether or not to exercise, successful people make ongoing arrangements to exercise with somebody else. Instead of using up their willpower on trivial choices, they conserve it for important decisions and emergencies. Planning for all decisions in advance - or eliminating the need to make any - is a great way to keep things - and yourself - under control.So think and plan ahead, and set up systems that will make things easy for you.What changes will you make to reduce decision fatigue? How far can you go in creating a personal system to eliminate decision making and to automate all aspects of your life?
3. Understand The Power of Habit
Willpower alone is not enough. It’s hard to maintain, because it can become exhausted, especially when the pressure is on. Habits, however, are automatic and come as naturally as breathing.We need to make changes that are long-lasting - and establish good habits that become a way of life. Most choices we make might feel like the result of thoughtful decision-making,but they're not: they're habits. In time, each of our decisions - about the food we eat, what we say to our children each evening, and how frequently we exercise - all have a huge impact on our health, productivity, wealth, and happiness in the longer term.
Establishing good habits in these areas will help you to operate well in all conditions - dispensing with the need to resort to willpower, while still succeeding in maintaining self-control.If we can lower the barriers to taking action on positive things, we can begin to form good habits. If we put up barriers to negative activities, we can break any bad habits. At the core of every habit is a neurological loop with three parts: a cue, a routine, and a reward. Let’s use the example of developing a habit to go running each morning. Choose a simple cue (eg - getting out of bed), establish a routine that is triggered by that cue (lacing up your trainers or always going for a 3 mile run at 5am) and think of the reward (endorphin rush). Apply this principle to other behaviours and habits in your life, and use them to create better ones. Once you're aware of how your habit works, and can recognize the cues and rewards, you're on the way to changing it - for the better.
What good habits will you establish?
How will you put them into action?
4.                    Use The 20 second rule
Because our willpower is limited, lasting change might seem impossible to achieve. And when it fails, we fall back into old habits and take the path of least resistance. 
 Achor lists a very powerful tool in his book The Happiness Advantage called the 20-second rule. This principle shows how we can re-route the path of least resistance and replace bad habits with good ones. It is very easy to use: identify the habits that you want to lose and make it 20 seconds more difficult to do them. Addicted to cigarettes? Leave them upstairs or in the car, where they’re not so easily accessed. Lock up the alcohol and add an additional 20 seconds to the task by keeping the keys at the other side of the house (or don’t buy any, turning it into the 20-minute rule, by the time you’ve nipped to the off-licence). Want to escape work in the evening? Leave the smartphone and laptop in the furthest room (or at the office!). The 20-second rule also works in developing new, good habits. If you want to exercise, make it 20 seconds easier: lay out your clothes the night before. Even better – go to sleep in your gym clothes! If you want to make a habit of prioritising your to-do list each day, keep it clearly visible on your desktop, rather than having to pull it up or look for it. Making things easier reduces the amount of willpower it takes to do it, thereby increasing your success. When you make your bad habit harder to do while making the good habit easier, you are much more likely to take the easy route. 
It’s been proven by research that we will even do things that are less satisfying if it’s easier.
Just because we know the right thing to do, we don’t automatically do it. 
Plan ahead, anticipating your needs, and aim to make things accessible and easy to do.
Always make your vice at least 20 seconds away, while making your virtue immediately available. 
So use the 20-Second Rule.
Create barriers to habits you want to resist, and make it easy for the desired ones. 
Where will you use the 20 second rule
To address bad habits?
To develop good habits?
With all this knowledge, you can use your own self-control to supercharge your ability to succeed.
In brief, some top self control tips are:
Develop your self-control system – and systematise your life.
Develop and maintain good habits and routines to take the strain off your willpower.
Plan in advance, to make things easier.
Exercise your self-control regularly in small ways.
Learn to recognise signs that your willpower may be getting depleted.
Sleep well and eat good food regularly.
Don’t do too much at once.
Since self-control is essential to your success, it’s too important for it to be out of control.
Mastery is much easier when you understand how you work – and take action to make yourself even better!
Take control – now.
https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140504124125-16911014-how-to-control-self-control?trk=mp-details-rc
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Self control is composed of willpower and habit.
*self-control is a proven and significant key to success.
*Utilising self-control means realizing and displaying your inner power –
*better self-control can boost our productivity, improve our health, make us more money,
and even lengthen our lives!
*to succeed – take control of your self control!
*There is a direct connection between self-control and success
*using this knowledge to your advantage can turbo charge your own success.
As a Turbo Charged Reader, each step has powerful and effective MP3(+)s that deal with the stresses of life and these MP3(+)s are yours to use forever and, also, you are taught how to use these skills without an electronic devise. I think that the operative words above are ’inner power’ and that is exactly what these MP3(+)s are designed to release so that you can use these skills to your advantage and turbo charge your own success.

*Willpower - the ability to resist temptation and restrain our impulses - is the most important factor in achieving a successful and happy life
*understanding and using willpower and habit – providing an incredible way to free yourself,
and be more successful at the same time
*Where - or when - does your willpower fail you?
*Willpower can be trained and strengthened with practice and improved over time.
*Willpower can get tired if you overuse it
*The more decisions we make, the weaker our willpower can become.
*So think and plan ahead, and set up systems that will make things easy for you.
As a hypnotherapist we never have enquiries from people who claim to have far too much will power to be ‘put under’ as they are utterly exhausted as they try to control every aspect of their lives
and can’t cope with ‘someone else messing with that control’.
Sorry, I couldn’t not put in that both those ideas are the person’s and have no part in hypnotherapy.
However, I didn’t realise that a complexity of small decisions were gradually eroding your energy.
I’m sure that there have been times when you’ve felt so tired or ill that you just want someone else
to make a simple decision – I know I have.
With Turbo Charged Reading decisions have to be made but they incremental and are strategically placed throughout the progression. Also there is a clear formula for making these decisions
and that is your purpose at this particular point in your TCR progression.
The point of making these planning decisions is in fact to avoid wasting time and effort,
to utilise your time efficiently and to make sure that you get just what you want from the text
right now leaving the rest in storage for future access.
Oh, and you can discuss at a general level a 2-300 page non-fiction book in half an hour
as opposed to a great many hours – and of course you remember what you’ve read.

Habit
*Many of us are constrained by our habits and a certain degree of lack of self control.
I describe this as the Devil-we-know and along with lack of confidence, procrastination
and unrealistic expectations plus your personal gremlins these form the principal reasons
why someone may not complete the course that they have not only purchased with money
but more importantly purchased with expectations as to how their life is going to improve significantly.
I can confess to succumbing to the Devil-you-know and procrastination, ooops and unrealistic expectations.
*the way we deal with emails, You deal with emails, the morning news or memos initially in exactly
the same way as you would TCR War and Peace so you would use your time efficiently
and be more informed that the average bear.
*Habits, however, are automatic and come as naturally as breathing.
It is because habits are so natural that I have spent a lot of time and effort producing the material
in three formats, the written word, a copy of the written word as an MP3(notes) and a re-enforcer
of that lesson as an MP3(+) and these (+)s use the focussed learning state which is rather like
Turbo Charged Reading for the ears.
*We need to make changes that are long-lasting - and establish good habits that become a way
of life. Turbo Charged Reading is a formula that is repeated until it becomes your natural way of reading. My first proof of this was that I naturally turned the pages of books in the TCR way J
*Develop and maintain good habits and routines to take the strain off your willpower.
Again, the TCR formula or plan breaks the reading and recall into a simple step process.
*Plan in advance, to make things easier. That is the purpose of purpose at each step of the way.
*Sleep well and eat good food regularly.
*Don’t do too much at once.
One guy poured 20,000 pages into his innermind in a week,
30 book a day is not unknown etc. You are not actually ‘working’ or stressing as once you’ve set your purpose the rest happens automatically as you are using your body and energy systems naturally.
*Since self-control is essential to your success, it’s too important for it to be out of control.
Moving from your comfort zone of, 'I’ve managed so far in life slow reading' to having time to what you enjoy in life after achieving more from your reading is, actually, a large habit to overcome for some.
Hence the MP3(+)s.
*Mastery is much easier when you understand how you work – and take action to make yourself even better! Yes, it’s up to you.

*sitting up straight, can pay off by reinforcing longer-term self-control in other activities.
Sitting correctly helps to oxygenate your spine and brain, you and your muscles are less tired.
*planning for the slow-release burning of healthy calories - are most important.

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Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?
Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com         gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               which takes advantage of the experience and expertise of others.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com         just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Wednesday, 7 May 2014

Increasing Your Income 1000% Formula. Brian Tracy

Increasing Your Income 1000% Formula
Learn Brian Tracy's strategy of increasing Your Income 1000% is based on the law of incremental improvement, the principal of continuous betterment. There is a thing in success called the "momentum principal." This means once you get going, it becomes easier and easier to keep going and to go faster and faster. You become more efficient, get more things done, become more productive and set better priorities. If you work 26% more efficiently every year for 10 years you will be 1004% better.


Bryan Tracy says you can read 60 books a year. Why only 60?

M'reen's notes of the video:
      1. Reading is exercise to the mind as exercise is to the body.
He advises reading for 1 hour each morning to set your mind up for the day.
But as a TCR reader you know that you can TCR a normal sized non-fiction or text book 
in 6-10 minutes and spend 20 minutes the following day bringing that material 
into your working awareness. And if you want a deeper or more detailed knowledge 
then you simply spend a little more time with that book.
You also know that your memory and recall of what you have read is secure.
Using his 1 hour principal you could TCR 10 books a week and not 1
Brian Tracy says that reading for an hour a day will result in reading 1 book a week or 60 books 
a year. Your dissertation is using the information actively in your life. TCR 600 / yr
He says that a university degree – even in astrophysics - only requires 30-50 books 
with a dissertation at the end.
      2.       List what you have to do that day. 
                This is establishing your Purpose the effective route through any activity.
      3.       Order that list in importance.   
                This is refining of the Focus of your purpose ensures TCR is time and effort efficient.
      4.       Start with No. 1
                Get in the zone with TCR; this is known as the focussed state of learning
          and is achieved with 3 breaths.
      5.       Listen to audio programmes in the car; turn your car into a university
                on wheels.                     
               With the TCR programme all the written material is re-presented as MP3(notes)
                for you to use when ironing, walking or indeed driving.
                Not only that BUT, also, the material is repeated in an MP3(+) format so that you can
                listen to the lesson while in the focussed state of learning and that is TCR via the
                ears ;) 
      Studies have proved that you get almost the equivalent of a full university attendance
      in your car university. However 90-95% of what is taught by a university is not practical
      in real life. But in your university car you choose what you listen to 
      and you choose what is relevant to you at this point in time.
      6.    After a meeting or event or action ask yourself 2 questions. 
a)    What did I do right? And then jot down notes as to what you did well. 
b)    What would I do better next time? 
When Turbo Charged Reading these 2 questions could be represented as:
a)    Giving your innermind orders as to what it is expected to do with the information 
     you’ve just poured into it.
b)    We’d create Mind Maps
Business and Sports coaches use this approach of giving your mind a positive instruction 
knowing that your mind is programmed to follow instructions.
I attempted drowning and failed and then decided what I would do next time
if faced with such a situation.
A few days later my mind/body simply reacted and I have no recall
of actively getting myself out of trouble, just of sitting on the edge of the pool.
      7.   Treat everyone, everyone – strangers to closest family as the most important person
            in your life.
      Starting with yourself! Your circles of influence start with yourself and spread outwards.
An important part of TCR is to tame your gremlins and change then into your strongest supporters. By themselves these MP3(+)s can be life changing and work with the 5 major problems 
of Turbo Charged Reading and these problems are:
1.    Confidence
2.    Procrastination
3.    Habit
4.    Unrealistic expectations
5.    Your own special blocks to success
      Turbo Charge Read your positive self development.
      Turbo Charge Read your educational and business success.
Turbo Charge Read in your aesthetic, sports and hobby areas.

Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?
Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com         gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com               which takes advantage of the experience and expertise of others.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com         just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”