Wednesday, 28 October 2015

Jim Rohn on Reading with Book Suggestions



1. Think and grow rich.
2. The richest man in Babalon.
etc

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com      gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com           take advantage of business experience and expertise.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com     just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Sunday, 25 October 2015

Differences Between American and British English

Door sneck.

Differences Between American and British English
Kenneth Beare,

While there are certainly many more varieties of English, American English and British English
are the two varieties that are taught in most ESL/EFL programs.
Generally, it is agreed that no one version is "correct" however, there are certainly preferences
in use. The three major differences between American and British English are:
Pronunciation - differences in both vowel and consonants, as well as stress and intonation
Vocabulary - differences in nouns and verbs, especially phrasal verb usage
Spelling - differences are generally found in certain prefix and suffix forms
The most important rule of thumb is to try to be consistent in your usage.
If you decide that you want to use American English spellings then be consistent in your spelling
(i.e. The color of the orange is also its flavour - color is American spelling and flavour is British),
this is of course not always easy - or possible.
Learn ESL: Grammatical Differences In British And American English
The following guide is meant to point out the principal differences between these two varieties
of English.

Use of the Present Perfect
In British English the present perfect is used to express an action that has occurred in the recent past that has an effect on the present moment.
For example:
I've lost my key. Can you help me look for it?
In American English the following is also possible:
I lost my key. Can you help me look for it?
In British English the above would be considered incorrect.
However, both forms are generally accepted in standard American English.
Other differences involving the use of the present perfect in British English
and simple past in American English include already, just and yet.

British English:
I've just had lunch
I've already seen that film
Have you finished your homework yet?
American English:
I just had lunch OR I've just had lunch
I've already seen that film OR I already saw that film.
Have your finished your homework yet? OR Did you finish your homework yet?

Possession
There are two forms to express possession in English.
Have or Have got
Do you have a car?
Have you got a car?
He hasn't got any friends.
He doesn't have any friends.
She has a beautiful new home.
She's got a beautiful new home.
While both forms are correct (and accepted in both British and American English),
have got (have you got, he hasn't got, etc.) is generally the preferred form in British English
while most speakers of American English employ the have (do you have, he doesn't have etc.)

The Verb Get
The past participle of the verb get is gotten in American English.
Example He's gotten much better at playing tennis.
British English - He's got much better at playing tennis.
M’reen, as a Brit. I have to admit that gotten irritates me.
However I lived in the States for some years and we are inundated with American media
so I get confused.
Also many British English people have no idea how to use tenses
and they use ‘them’ as also meaning ‘those’ and ‘these’.
UGH!!!!

Vocabulary
Probably the major differences between British and American English lies in the choice
of vocabulary. Some words mean different things in the two varieties for example:
Mean: (American English - angry, bad humored, British English - not generous, tight fisted)
Rubber: (American English - condom, British English - tool used to erase pencil markings)
We think this is funny and the American name Randy.
There are many more examples (too many for me to list here). If there is a difference in usage,
your dictionary will note the different meanings in its definition of the term.
Many vocabulary items are also used in one form and not in the other.
One of the best examples of this is the terminology used for automobiles.
American English - hood
British English - bonnet
American English - trunk
British English - boot
American English - truck
British English - lorry
Once again, your dictionary should list whether the term is used in British English
or American English.
For a more complete list of the vocabulary differences between British and American English

Prepositions
There are also a few differences in preposition use including the following:
American English - on the weekend
British English - at the weekend
American English - on a team
British English - in a team
American English - please write me soon
British English - please write to me soon
Oh yes, missing out words is also irritating, but so many British English speakers miss out words.
Unfortunately it sounds as if you are uneducated or of a lower class – we are into social class.

Past Simple/Past Participles
The following verbs have two acceptable forms of the past simple/past participle in both American and British English, however, the irregular form is generally more common in British English
(the first form of the two) and the regular form is more common to American English.
Burn
Burnt OR burned
Dream
dreamt OR dreamed
Lean
leant OR leaned
Learn
learnt OR learned
Smell
smelt OR smelled
Spell
spelt OR spelled
Spill
spilt OR spilled
Spoil
spoilt OR spoiled
Spelling
Here are some general differences between British and American spellings:

Words ending in -or (American) -our (British) color, colour, humor, humour, flavor, flavour etc.
Words ending in -ize (American) -ise (British) recognize, recognise, patronize, patronise etc.
Our famous Samuel Peeps is to blame for most of our terrible spelling
and then an American did an incomplete job of spelling words sensibly.
The Spanish have the least problem with this branch of dyslexia
because of their sensible approach to creating and writing the spoken word.
The Scottish are the best at spelling British English because they enunciate all the letters in a word.

The best way to make sure that you are being consistent in your spelling is to use the spell checker
on your word processor (if you are using the computer of course) and choose which variety
of English you would like. As you can see, there are really very few differences between 
However, the largest difference is probably that of the choice of vocabulary and pronunciation.
http://esl.about.com/od/toeflieltscambridge/a/dif_ambrit.htm



 You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com          take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Thursday, 22 October 2015

The Impact of Writing on the Brain

Part of my painting of a canal bridge in Skipton, North Yorkshire. UK.

The Impact of Writing on the Brain
Pam Hurley

The ability to write well is a powerful tool.  It’s a skill that captures people’s attention,
persuades, solves problems, and leaves an emotional impression. 
A well-written document can easily sway a powerful audience, be they clients or co-workers. 
Not convinced?  Keep reading!

This infographic below, “Amazing Facts on Writing and How it Affects our Brain,”
reveals some fascinating details about how authors and readers respond to good and bad writing.
The act of writing itself stimulates an important system in the brain known as
the reticular activating system (RAS), which is responsible for filtering
and processing information.  When you physically write something down,
the RAS focuses more closely on processing what you write. 
This, in turn, increases your ability to remember it.
Now, how do you ensure that an audience also remembers?  
The key is presenting your information in an engaging way. 
On paper, or even on a computer screen, the way your words are organized is key.
The act of reading PowerPoint slides for example,
where information is usually listed in bullet point form, doesn’t engage,
but activates only the areas of the brain that process language
for the purpose of interpreting meaning. 
Without variation, readers aren’t inspired to think any further about what they see.
In contrast, organizing information strategically keeps the audience hooked. 
Not all facts should be listed in the same format, and the evolution of the message
should be clear.  Writing an engaging document is similar to telling a story orally. 
Your audience should be able to tell that you’re building upon your introduction
to get to the conclusion.
Additionally, using descriptive language, including action words,
appeals to the motor cortex part of the brain. 
The cortex works to trigger a sensory response in readers that they’ll remember later. 
However, overused or cliché words don’t have the same sensory effect in that
they’re simply processed for understanding as are  the PowerPoint bullets and are easily forgotten.
All of Hurley Write, Inc.’s courses cover the basics of good writing, from using language effectively,
to proper sentence structure, and to ensuring engaging organization. 
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/impact-writing-brain-pam-hurley?trk=mp-reader-card


As a writer, you likely practice your craft without really thinking about how the process of writing affects your brain. However, it is pretty fascinating the way that our brains are hardwired
to interpret the written word. You might not realize how much of an effect that reading and writing 
has on the brain, or what is happening in the brain as you write down a story or read a novel.
In order to improve your writing skills, it’s helpful to know how writing and reading work
in the human brain so that you can create written content
that will have the most effect on the reader.
Check out this intriguing infographic to learn more about the connection between writing
and the brain. It just might give you some insight into how you can become a better
and more effective writer and understand how your stories affect your readers.
Infographic picture
Writing Stimulates Our Brain’s Memories
Many scientists have done studies on how we understand reading and writing,
with some pretty interesting results. They have found out about why stories
help us remember information better than lists of facts
and how our brains react to descriptive passages.
They have even discovered the scientific why clichés are so boring and should be avoided in writing. It turns out that our brains become de-sensitized to metaphors and sensory language
that are used too often and these phrases no longer produce the same reaction in the brain.
That is why being original is so important in your writing.
Ian Arnison-Phillips is a writer who believes that when guest blogging, it is important
to focus on your craft and how your brain interprets the written word to create interesting material.
http://www.bestinfographics.co/amazing-facts-about-writing-and-the-brain-infographic/

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneously recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com          take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Monday, 19 October 2015

7 Life Changing Books You've Probably Never Read

'Opium' poppy.


1. Spiritual Enlightenment the Damnedest Thing. 
1. Spiritually Incorrect
1. Spiritual Warfare
2. The Psychology of Self-Esteem
3. The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem
4. A New Earth
5. The Power of Now
6. An American Life
7. The Big Leap
You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com          take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Friday, 16 October 2015

Reading Tips to Improve Your Conversation

A stone style. Can you create a story from this scene?

Reading Tips to Improve Your Conversation
Kenneth Beare

Choose an article or short story to read with a friend or classmate.
Discuss the article together.
Choose an article or short story to read with a friend or classmate.
Each person should write down five questions about the article and his / her partner.
Read a few articles to develop a debate.
Hold the debate in class making arguments based on what you have read.

Read a short play with a few friends.
Continue the conversation by each taking a character from the play
and having a discussion about something that happened in the play.

Read dialogues.
Once you've practiced the written texts,
improvise a continued conversation using the same characters as in the dialogue.

Read short biographies.
Pair up with a friend or classmate and take on the roles of interviewer and famous person
(taken from the biography).

http://esl.about.com/od/englishreadingskills/a/rtp_conv.htm

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
 www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com           take advantage of business experience and expertise.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com     just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”   

Tuesday, 13 October 2015

How beer and coffee affect your brain. How writing affects your brain.

Self-heal.

How beer and coffee affect your brain.

Let’s talk about two of my favorite beverages, beer and coffee.
They both can affect your body in good and bad ways.
I usually start my day with coffee and occasionally end it with a beer
but these beverages may be affecting you more than you think.
The infographic below creatively displays how each drink affects the brains
and even which parts of the brain. It may be obvious that beer can affect the brain
as most of the dumb things we have done have been after we had a beer or two.
The best thing I got from this infographic is that beer can help you come up with ideas.
So I think it’s time we tell our bosses that drinking beer at work helps with our creativity.
Do you think they will buy it? They have to it’s on an infographic, so it must be true!

http://www.bestinfographics.co/how-beer-and-coffee-affect-your-brain-infographic/

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneously recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com      gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com           take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Saturday, 10 October 2015

How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins

Scabeous providing a beautiful luncheon table.




You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com      gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com           take advantage of business experience and expertise.
www.happyartaccidents.blogspot.com     just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Thursday, 8 October 2015

Reading Comprehension for Students with Dyslexia


Reading Comprehension for Students with Dyslexia
Eileen Bailey
Special Education Expert

Students with dyslexia often focus so much on sounding out each word they miss the meaning
of what they are reading. This deficiency in reading comprehension skills can cause problems
not only in school but throughout a person's life. Some of the problems that occur are
a lack of interest in reading for pleasure, poor vocabulary development and difficulties
in employment, especially in job positions where reading would be required.
Teachers often spend a great deal of time helping children with dyslexia learn to decode new words, decoding skills and improving reading fluency. Sometimes reading comprehension is overlooked.
But there are many ways teachers can help students with dyslexia improve their reading comprehension skills.


How To Detect Early Reading Struggles
Reading comprehension is not just one skill but a combination of many different skills.
The following provides information, lesson plans and activities to help teachers
work to improve reading comprehension skills in students with dyslexia:

Making Predictions: 
A prediction is a guess as to what will happen next in a story.
Most people will naturally make predictions while they read, however, students with dyslexia
have a hard time with this skill. This can be because their focus is on sounding out words
rather than thinking about the meaning of the words.

Summarizing: 
Being able to summarize what you read not only helps in reading comprehension
but also helps students retain and remember what they read.
This is also an area students with dyslexia find difficult.

Additional: A Language Art Lesson Plan on Summarizing Text for High School Students
Using Texting Vocabulary Learning new words in print and word recognition 
are both problem areas for children with dyslexia.
They may have a large spoken vocabulary but cannot recognize words in print.

The following activities can help build vocabulary skills:

Organizing Information –
Another aspect of reading comprehension that students with dyslexia have a problem with
is organizing information they have read. Often, these students will rely on memorization,
oral presentations or following other students rather than internally organizing information
from written text. Teachers can help by providing an overview before reading, using graphic organizers and teaching students to look for how information is organized in a story or book.

Inferences –
Much of the meaning we derive from reading is based on what is not said.
This is implied information. Students with dyslexia understand literal material
but have a harder time finding hidden meanings.

Using Contextual Clues –
Many adults with dyslexia rely on contextual clues to understand what is read
because other reading comprehension skills are weak. Teachers can help students develop contextual skills to help improve reading comprehension.

Using Previous Knowledge –
When reading, we automatically use our personal experiences and what we have previously learned to make written text more personal and meaningful. Students with dyslexia may have a problem connecting prior knowledge to written information. Teachers can help students activate
prior knowledge by pre-teaching vocabulary, providing background knowledge
and creating opportunities to continue building background knowledge.

http://specialed.about.com/od/readingliteracy/a/Reading-Comprehension-Dyslexia.htm

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com          take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

In praise of teaching as a subversive activity


In praise of teaching as a subversive activity
Harry Fletcher-Wood

“You cannot step twice into the same stream”
Heraclitus of Ephesus

Writing in the late 1960s, the authors of Teaching as a Subversive Activity 
worked from two assumptions: society’s survival is under threat and something may – perhaps – 
be done about it.  In response, they set out to challenge the foundations of the education system and invited teachers to re-imagine schools to benefit students and society.
I reread the book recently for the third time in four years.  
Each reading has felt different; each time, I’ve been challenged to rethink what I ‘know’
and believe about education.  The authors offer some wonderful insights,
wittily and memorably expressed and well worth sharing –
alongside some truly dreadful suggestions.  
My appreciation of which is which has changed over time.  This post focuses on the former –
ideas with a spark of genius, or of insight.  Next week, I’ll write about aspects I’d contest.

1) Education should prepare students for contemporary society
Postman and Weingartner believed schools have a major role in ‘saving’ society.  
They proposed what David Riesman called a ‘counter-cyclical’ approach:
“schools should stress values that are not stressed by other major institutions in the culture.”  
This could be achieved by acting as an “anti-entropic force,” providing students
with Hemingway’s suggested necessity: “a built-in, shock-proof crap-detector,”
which would allow a student “to be part of his own culture and, at the same time, to be out of it.”
In this spirit, the authors argue that education must be relevant.  
Firstly, because society faces a raft of problems, including: “…the communications revolution,
which, having taken us unawares, has ignited the civil-rights problem,
unleashed the electronic-bugging problem, and made visible the sex problem….  ‘progress’,
a somewhat paradoxical manifestation that has also resulted in the air-pollution problem,
the water-pollution problem, the garbage-disposal problem….  we must not omit alluding to
the international scene: the Bomb problem, the Vietnam problem, the Red China problem…”  
And yet, they believed, teachers and educationalists were blind to this.  
At a conference they attended, rather than discussing poverty, Vietnam,
or an “ugly history of racial crisis” the authors found discussion of which grammar to teach;
“Where is the learner in this?  Where is his world?”
Secondly, they contend that students’ perception of relevance is essential to their learning: 
“There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning.”  
One thought experiment they propose runs:
“Suppose all the syllabi and curricula and textbooks in all the schools disappeared.”  
Suppose, then, that you decided to create new curriculum consisting of questions.
These questions would have to be worth seeking answers to not only from your point of view but, more importantly, from the point of view of the students….  Take a pencil and list your questions
on the next page, which we have left blank for you.  Please do not be concerned about
decaying our book, unless, of course, one of your questions was going to be
‘What were some of the ways of learning a living in Ancient Egypt?’  
In that case, use your own paper.”

2) Teachers should listen to and understand themselves and their students
They advocate a thorough investigation by teachers into their own attitudes and beliefs:
“The process, once begun, leads in many unexpected directions but most often to the question
‘Why am I a teacher, anyway?”  Moreover, they believe that teachers should spend
much more time in listening to their students and seeking to understand their needs.  
The authors advocate a technique they take from Carl Rogers: students engage in a discussion
with “an unusual rule applied to it.  A student may say anything he wishes
but only after he has restated what the previous speaker has said 
to that speaker’s satisfaction.  
Astounding things happen to students when they go through this experience.”  
In some cases students “find they have projected themselves into the frame of mind
of another person….  But, of course, you ought to try it yourself first.”

3) Education needs to challenge students to think for themselves
“Mostly, [students] are required to remember…  
They are rarely encouraged to ask substantive questions….  
what students mostly do in class is guess what the teacher wants them to say.”

4) Radical structural changes would improve schools, teachers and students
Here is a thought-provoking list of suggestions they offer:
1. Declare a five-year moratorium on the use of all textbooks
2. Have “English” teachers “teach” Math, Math teachers English,
Social Studies teachers science, Science teachers Art, and so on.
3. Transfer all elementary teachers to high school and vice versa.
4. Require every teacher who thinks he knows his “subject” well to write a book on it.
5. Dissolve all “subjects”, “courses”, and “course requirements”.
6. Limit each teacher to three declarative sentences per class, and 15 interrogatives.
7. Prohibit teachers from asking any questions they already know the answers to.
8. Declare a moratorium on all tests and grades.
9. Require all teachers to undergo some form of psychotherapy as part of their in-service training
10. Classify teachers according to their ability and make the lists public.
11. Require all teachers to take a test prepared by students on what the students know.
12. Make every class an elective and withhold a teacher’s monthly check
if his students do not show any interest in going to next month’s classes.
 13. Require every teacher to take a one-year leave of absence every fourth year
to work in some other “field” other than education.
14. Require each teacher to provide some sort of evidence that
he or she has had a loving relationship with at least one other human being.
15. Require that all the graffiti accumulated in the school toilets be reproduced on large paper
and be hung in the school halls.
16. There should be a general prohibition against the following words and phrases: syllabus,
covering ground, I.Q., makeup test, disadvantaged, gifted, accelerated, enhancement, course,
grade, score, human nature, dumb, college material and administrative necessity.”
Some of these I’ve tried, some I’d advocate wholeheartedly, and some would, I suspect,
cause little but harm.  The full proposals – and highly entertaining justifications – c
an be seen in the pictures below (see particularly number 14):
Teaching as a Subversive Activity is a wonderful book which everyone should read.  
It’s also a product of its age, and many of its prescriptions have been tried
and found deeply wanting.  My next post will look at some of the issues I have with it.
http://improvingteaching.co.uk/2015/04/12/in-praise-of-teaching-as-a-subversive-activity/

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneously recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com          take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Tuesday, 6 October 2015

5 Books that Changed my Life

King cup.


The success principles. Jack Canfield
The road less traveled. M Scott Peck
Think and grow rich. Napoleon Hill. Also on Brian Tracy's 3 book list.
How to win friends and influence people. Dale Carnegie
Man's search for meaning. Victore Frankl


You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com     gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourinnerminds.blogspot.com          take advantage of business experience and expertise.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”