Thursday, 22 June 2017

My Study Routine for University (and Exams) | TIA TAYLOR

Sycamore leaf skeleton.





Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneous recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com                       development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.
To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Friday, 16 June 2017

IELTS Writing Task 1 - What to write!

Misty.





Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember all>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
All aspects of regular, each-word reading and education.
Turbo Charged Reading uses these skills significantly faster
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com                       development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Saturday, 10 June 2017

No. 1 Reason Practice Makes Perfect

This saddle fungus has never come back these last few years.

No. 1 Reason Practice Makes Perfect
The Brain Science of Muscle Memory
Christopher Bergland

My father was born the son of Montana missionaries in the 1930s. Becoming the Montana State tennis champion as a high school student was his ticket out of Glendive. He got a scholarship
to attend college, went on to Cornell medical school and became a neurosurgeon. 
He said, "Of this I am absolutely positive, becoming a neurosurgeon was a direct consequence
of my eye for the ball." This quotation sums up The Athlete's Way because it captures the parallels between sports and career that come into play for all of us. It also captures why I am so interested
in the link between brain science and athletics--and the link between 'practice, practice, practice' 
and success.
Although being a state tennis champion is technically what got my father a college scholarship,
that 'trophy' is secondary to everything else that he learned on the tennis court that stuck
with him for the rest of his life. His brain was rewired through his daily workouts. He was able to transfer his 'eye for the ball' into 'focus' and remain intellectually sharper than the rest.
His daily tennis practice gave him the physicality, dexterity, and stamina to be a world-class surgeon.
My father wanted me to be the next Bj√∂rn Borg. I put a lot of pressure on myself to succeed from a very young age. I wanted my father to be proud of me and I worked very hard on the tennis court. When I was growing up, tennis was our only real alone time and we played every Sunday. His coaching was based on an understanding that muscle memory is stored in a part of your brain called the "cerebellum" (Latin: little brain). My dad's mantra to me as a kid was:
"Carve the grooves into the cerebellum, Chris. Think about hammering and forging your
muscle memory with every stroke." The cerebellum is the #1 reason that practice makes perfect.
He knew from tennis and surgery that you had to do the same thing again and again and again
to hardwire it into long-term muscle memory that is stored in the cerebellum. I played tennis
for the first time in almost a decade a few weeks ago and was amazed how quickly all those years
of playing with my dad and the hours and hours of hitting a ball repetitively against a backboard came rushing back. It is exactly the same 'cerebellar' (pertaining to the cerebellum)
long-term muscle memory we refer to when we say: "It's just like riding a bike." You never forget how to do it once you've hardwired it into the skill center of the cerebellum through practice.
Before you read any farther, please watch this short 2-minute cartoon compiled by the DORE programs of the UK that brilliantly explains how the cerebellum relates to your cerebrum
when learning and mastering new skills. Video unavailable.

The word cerebellum was coined by Leonardo da Vinci in 1504
when he was making anatomical wax castings of the brain. The cerebellum is the size of a kiwi
and is tucked under the much larger cerebrum in the base of your skull.
The average cerebellum only weighs one-quarter of a pound but ounce-for-ounce packs a walloping punch. Although the cerebellum is only 10% of total brain volume it holds more than 50%
of the brain's neurons. Because of this disproportionate distribution of neurons my father
always said of the cerebellum, "Whatever it's doing, it's doing a lot of it." He was obsessed
with trying to unravel the mysteries of the cerebellum and passed that obsession on to me.
As a kid the word 'cerebellum' and 'cerebrum' seemed too complex so I coined the term 'up brain' for the cerebrum and 'down brain' for the cerebellum. I know that these terms may seem grammatically incorrect but they are a direct and cogent response to the terms 'left brain'
and 'right brain.'  In the 70s there was a lot of talk about the left brain being your 'intellectual' brain that was good with words and numbers; and your right brain being your 'creative' brain
that was good with images and art.
If pushed to categorize the cognitive differences between the down brain and up brain,
I would say that the up brain is the house of your conscious 'thinking mind' and the down brain
 is the house of your intuitive 'subconscious mind.' However, I am fully aware that dividing the brain and mind into a rigid dichotomy of 'down brain-up brain' is an oversimplification
and not 100% scientifically accurate. Nonetheless, I still find this split-brain model
a useful paradigm for facilitating self-understanding and improvement.
All parts of the brain work together in concert for everything we do. Assigning specific traits
solely to one hemisphere--or any portion of the brain--is generally considered to be 'bad science.' That said, I would still encourage you to use the terms down brain-up brain as a simple and visual way to categorize an aspect of your psychology when you are taking inventory of your mindset
and behavior. As a split-brain model it is helpful for isolating habits and character traits.
Once you have identified an area that needs work, you can then make changes that will maximize your potential and improve your performance in sports and in life.
For example: Arthur Ashe said, "There is a syndrome in sports called 'paralysis by analysis'." One helpful way to avoid being too 'analytical' is to tag that mindset as being too "up brain" or cerebral. If you are over-thinking things, your very large prefrontal cortex stored in the up brain
is getting in the way and blocking the more intuitive 'down brain' from working it's non-thinking
and completely fluid muscle memory magic.
The up brain is so big and so powerful that it is hard to turn it down sometimes. When you choke
in sport, or become over-excited, it is because your up brain is overpowering your down brain. Remember this visual and literally shift your consciousness away from the prefrontal cortex
by relaxing the backs of your eyes, taking some deep breathes and 'letting go.'
To create super fluid performance you need to seat yourself in the down brain which has –
practiced, practiced, practiced - and have your actions spring from there. 
I call this state of peak performance "Superfluidity." You become super fluid in sports - and in life - when you have freed up the working memory of your cerebrum to strategize and keep tabs on
the more cerebral aspects of everything that's going on while completely trusting your gut
and the intuitive powers of your cerebellum.
In closing, please watch this video of Roger Federer and Lleyton Hewitt
having one of the most incredible rallies in tennis history.
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wS5GisEQ_j8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

This is Superfluidity in action! Listen to the rhythmic timing of Roger Federer's footwork
(he's in the white shirt.) The down brain is running the show for both of them throughout
the early part of the rally. They almost look like robots repeating the same motion again and again and again as if they are both hitting against a backboard.  It creates a trance like feeling
but the up brain is waiting in the wings and calculating when to make a break and begin to play
the game of chess necessary to win the point with a strategic and unexpected placement.
This video holds many clues on how to maximize the use of your up brain and down brain on and off the court. Watch it again any time you need motivation to stick with it and practice, practice, practice anything that you want to become world-class at.
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-athletes-way/201110/no-1-reason-practice-makes-perfect


Turbo Charged ReadingRead More>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com      gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com        just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Sunday, 4 June 2017

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning

Ivy berries look like pin cushions.

The Neuroscience Behind Stress and Learning
Judy Willis MD

The realities of standardized tests and increasingly structured, if not synchronized,
curriculum continue to build classroom stress levels. Neuroimaging research reveals
the disturbances in the brain's learning circuits and neurotransmitters that accompany stressful learning environments. The neuroscientific research about learning has revealed the negative impact of stress and anxiety and the qualitative improvement of the brain circuitry involved in memory
and executive function that accompanies positive motivation and engagement.

The Proven Effects of Positive Motivation
Thankfully, this information has led to the development of brain-compatible strategies
 to help students through the bleak terrain created by some of the current trends imposed
by the Common Core State Standards and similar mandates.
With brain-based teaching strategies that reduce classroom anxiety
and increase student connection to their lessons,
educators can help students learn more effectively.
In the past two decades, neuroimaging and brain-mapping research have provided objective support to the student-centered educational model. This brain research demonstrates that superior learning takes place when classroom experiences are relevant to students' lives, interests, and experiences. Lessons can be stimulating and challenging without being intimidating,
and the increasing curriculum requirements can be achieved without stress, anxiety, boredom,
and alienation as the pervasive emotions of the school day.
During my 15 years of practicing adult and child neurology with neuroimaging and brain mapping
as part of my diagnostic tool kit, I worked with children and adults with brain function disorders, including learning differences. When I then returned to university to obtain my credential
and Masters of Education degree, these familiar neuroimaging tools had become available
to education researchers. Their widespread use in schools and classrooms globally has yet to occur.
This brain research demonstrates that superior learning takes place when classroom experiences
are motivating and engaging. Positive motivation impacts brain metabolism, conduction of nerve impulses through the memory areas, and the release of neurotransmitters that increase executive function and attention. Relevant lessons help students feel that they are partners in their education, and they are engaged and motivated.
We live in a stressful world and troubled times, and that is not supposed to be the way for children to grow up. Schools can be the safe haven where academic practices and classroom strategies provide children with emotional comfort and pleasure as well as knowledge.
When teachers use strategies to reduce stress and build a positive emotional environment,
students gain emotional resilience and learn more efficiently and at higher levels of cognition.

Neuroimaging and EEG Studies
Studies of electrical activity (EEG or brain waves) and metabolic activity (from specialized brain scans measuring glucose or oxygen use and blood flow) show the synchronization of brain activity
as information passes from the sensory input processing areas of the somatosensory cortex
to the reticular activating and limbic systems. For example, bursts of brain activity
from the somatosensory cortex are followed milliseconds later by bursts of electrical activity
in the hippocampus, amygdala, and then the other parts of the limbic system.
This data from one of the most exciting areas of brain-based learning research gives us a way to see which techniques and strategies stimulate or impede communication between the parts of the brain when information is processed and stored.
In other words, properly applied, we can identify and remove barriers to student understanding!

The amygdala is part of limbic system in the temporal lobe. It was first believed to function
as a brain center for responding primarily to anxiety and fear.
Indeed, when the amygdala senses threat, it becomes over-activated.
In students, these neuroimaging findings in the amygdala are seen with feelings of helplessness
and anxiety. When the amygdala is in this state of stress-induced over-activation,
new sensory information cannot pass through it to access the memory and association circuits.
This is the actual neuroimaging visualization of what has been called the affective filter 
by Stephen Krashen and others. This term describes an emotional state of stress in students
during which they are not responsive to learning and storing new information. What is now evident on brain scans during times of stress is objective physical evidence of this affective filter.
With such evidence-based research, the affective filter theories cannot be disparaged as
"feel-good education" or an "excuse to coddle students" -- if students are stressed out,
the information cannot get in. This is a matter of science.
This affective state occurs when students feel alienated from their academic experience
and anxious about their lack of understanding. Consider the example of the decodable "books"
used in phonics-heavy reading instruction. These are not engaging and motivating. They are usually not relevant to the students' lives because their goal is to include words that can be decoded
based on the lesson. Decodability is often at the expense of authentic meaning to the child.
Reading becomes tedious and, for some children, confusing and anxiety-provoking.
In this state, there is reduced passage of information through the neural pathways
from the amygdala to higher cognitive centers of the brain, including the prefrontal cortex,
where information is processed, associated, and stored for later retrieval and executive functioning.
Additional neuroimaging studies of the amygdala, hippocampus, and the rest of the limbic system, along with measurement of dopamine and other brain chemical transmitters during
the learning process, reveal that students' comfort level has critical impact on
information transmission and storage in the brain. The factors that have been found to affect
this comfort level such as self-confidence, trust and positive feelings for teachers,
and supportive classroom and school communities are directly related to the state of mind compatible with the most successful learning, remembering, and higher-order thinking.

The Power of Joyful Learning
The highest-level executive thinking, making connections, and "aha" moments of insight
and creative innovation are more likely to occur in an atmosphere of what Alfie Kohn calls 
exuberant discovery, where students of all ages retain that kindergarten enthusiasm
of embracing each day with the joy of learning. With current research and data in the field
of neuroscience, we see growing opportunities to coordinate the design of curriculum, instruction, and assessment in ways that will reflect these incredible discoveries.
Joy and enthusiasm are absolutely essential for learning to happen -- literally, scientifically,
as a matter of fact and research.
Shouldn't it be our challenge and opportunity to design learning that embraces these ingredients?

https://www.edutopia.org/blog/neuroscience-behind-stress-and-learning-judy-willis

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneously recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com  gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com        just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.

Sunday, 28 May 2017

10 Ways to Increase Your Reading Speed

Red sails at Felixstowe

10 Ways to Increase Your Reading Speed
Alexia Bullard

Do you have a lot of paperwork to get through with a deadline that continues to stalk you
around every corner? Do you have a lot of reading to do before class tomorrow?
 Do you simply just want to read at a faster rate, whether it be for your own personal reasons,
or for work? Here are ten proven ways to help increase your reading speed.

1. Stop the Inner Monologue
One’s inner monologue, also known as subvocalization, is an extremely common trait
among readers. It is the process of speaking the words in your head as you read,
and it is the biggest obstacle that gets in the way of you being able to increase your reading speed.
If you’re hearing voices in your head when you’re reading, don’t fret. As long as it is your own voice, reading along with you, you’re fine. In fact, this is how teachers teach kids to read – say the words silently in your head as you read. Do you recall the instructions, “Read in your head,
as I read the passage aloud”, that were said fairly often in the classrooms? That is one of the ways
in which this habit of having an inner monologue was ingrained into you as a young reader.
When you were initially taught to read, you were taught to sound out everything and read aloud. Once you were proficient enough at that, your teacher had you start saying the words in your head. This is how the habit originated, and most people continue reading this way. It does not adversely affect them in any way, until they start wanting to read at a faster pace. If you are seeking
to increase your reading speed, this is the first thing you must learn to overcome.
Why does this slow you down? The average reading speed is pretty much the same as the average talking speed. According to Forbes, the average adult reading speed is 300 words per minute.
The average talking speed is the same. Since most people are in the habit of saying the words aloud in their head as they read, they tend to read around the same pace as they talk. This means,
your reading speed will only increase so much if you continue to keep up that inner monologue.
If you want to continue to increase your reading speed, you need to eliminate it.
To do this, you need to understand one thing: It’s unnecessary. You do not need to say every word
in your head in order to understand the material you are reading. It was when you are younger,
but now you are able to input the meaning from just seeing the words. Your brain still processes
 the information. For example, when you see a “YIELD” sign, do you actually stop to speak the word in your head? Of course not. You just look at it and process it automatically.
This is what you need to be doing when you read your print material, such as books or paperwork.
If you have a hard time attempting this, try reading with instrumental music playing in headphones or chew on some gum. A distraction will keep your brain less focused on subvocalization,
though you will still look at the words and process them.

2. Word–Chunking
Word-chunking closely parallels with the idea of eliminating the inner monologue.
This is the act of reading multiple words at once, and is the key to reading faster.
All of these reading tips tie together, yet word-chunking is probably the most active tool to use when you work to increase your reading speed.
A person can take in several words at a time, even though we are trained –
as mentioned with the inner monologue – to read each word at a time and not miss a single article.
Using your peripheral vision is one way to make this step easier, but we will get to that
in the next section. For now, focus on trying to read three words with one glance.
Continue on down the page like that, taking note of how much faster you complete the entire page of text. You are still able to process and comprehend what you read, but spend far less time doing it.
Now, take that concept one step further. Take a pencil and lightly draw two vertical, parallel lines down your page, separating the text into three sections. Start at the top left of the page as usual, and cover up everything below that line with your hand or a piece of paper.
Focus on reading the text in each section as one thing. Chunk the words together, and read them at a glance as you would a road sign. Keep doing this down the page, moving the paper accordingly. You will notice that your speed was faster than before.
Continue with this method until you feel comfortable enough to challenge yourself a bit more.

3. Do Not Reread the Words on the Page
Before we move on to the peripheral vision part – that’s the real kicker – you’re going to want
to make sure you break the habit of rereading the words on the page. If you watch the average person’s eyes as they read, you will notice they jump and flit about. They do not just flow evenly back and forth, as they should. This is because the average person – you do this, too –
tends to backtrack over words they have already read.
This is one thing that prevents you from being able to increase your reading speed.
You most likely do this without even realizing that you are doing it, which makes it a bit of a tricky habit to break out of. The easiest way, even though you may feel a bit childish, is to use your finger or bookmark to guide you along. Keep your finger running back and forth across the page,
without stopping or going back. Keep tracking the words as your finger continues to make its way down the text. When you get to the end, think about what you read.
You did not go back over a single word (I hope!), and yet you still recall what you have read.

4. Use Peripheral Vision
Congratulations! You’ve made it to the key step that really ties everything together.
While this may not be the final step, it’s certainly a critical one. Use the techniques
from everything above to view and comprehend several words at one time.
Instead of chunking in smaller groups of words, try reading one line at a time.
This involves looking at the center of the line, and using your peripheral vision to read the rest of it. Scan the page in this manner and, when you reach the bottom,
you will find that you still understood what you read, but you did it in record time.

5. Use a Timer
Speaking of ‘record time’, now is your chance to test yourself and work on how to increase 
your reading speed each time you read. Set a timer for one minute, reading normally
as the time dwindles down. When the timer goes off, note how many pages you have read.
The website, WordstoPages, will help you to figure out how many words you have read.
Now, combine everything you have learned and repeat the test. Jot down that number, too.
Keep doing this, continuing to beat your previous count each time. Set a daily or weekly goal,
and treat yourself when you reach it.
Continue with this little game, and you’ll be able to increase your reading speed in no time!

6. Set a Goal
Holding yourself accountable will better ensure you stick with your reading and your timer tests. Give yourself a goal of a certain number of pages to read each day/week/etc., and stick to it.
When you reach it, treat yourself. Incentive never hurt anyone!

7. Read MORE
The old adage, “Practice makes perfect,” is actually pretty darn accurate. Any professional, artist, musician, etc. practices their work regularly. A reader should be doing the same thing.
The more you read, the more you will be better at it. The better you are at reading,
 the more you will increase your reading speed.  Theodore Roosevelt read one book
before breakfast, and then three or four more in the evening. He also read papers and other such pamphlet-style reading material. I’m not sure how long these books were,
but I am going to assume they were of average length. Use his obsession as fuel for your own goal.

8. Use a Marker
Do you find your vision slipping and sliding through the page as you read? Not a problem.
Simply place an index card below each line, and slip it down as you read. This will ensure you stay
at reading one line at a time, rather than flitting your eyes about and taking nothing in.

9. Work on Improving Your Vocabulary
Think about it: You’re reading along, and then you run into a word you don’t know.
Do you skip it? Do you try to figure it out by context? Do you stop to look it up?
Whichever course of action you take, you are slowing your time significantly,
if not stopping it all together to go and look up the retarding word. If you work on improving
your vocabulary, you will know more words. The more words you add to your repertoire, the faster you read. The faster you read, the more you can read. It may be self-evident, but it’s important.

10. Skim the Main Points FIRST
Finally, when you’re in a real time-crunch and need to get something read by yesterday,
take a deep breath and calm down. Open the book, and take some time reading over
all the main points. Read the table of contents. Read the subtitles.
Read the captions under the diagrams. Get an overall feel for the chapter/section/etc..
Next, read the first paragraph of each main section. Read the last. Read the middle.
Think this over in your head, and piece it together. Then, start reading everything else
while employing the techniques we have just discussed.
You’ll retain your information better, as well as your get your reading done faster.
In summation, the next time you need to read something quickly,
simply tell yourself to “Shut up and look at the page!”

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/10-ways-increase-your-reading-speed.html

Turbo Charged Reading: Readmore>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com          gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com         development, growth, management. 

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Monday, 22 May 2017

If You Do These 20 Things Every Day, You'll Become Smarter

  


 If You Do These 20 Things Every Day, You'll Become Smarter
Jayson DeMers

Although many people believe intelligence is limited to those with high I.Q.s,
there are a number of potential methods to boost one’s cognitive abilities
and become more effective at various professional and personal pursuits.
With enough motivation and determination, anyone can expand their mental capabilities
 and become smarter. Integrating new habits into your regular routine and providing
proper stimulation can sharpen your intellect quickly and leave you inspired to take on
new challenges each day. Brain health is an important key in complete physical health.
The list below includes the best brain-engaging activities in daily life.

Inviting Novelty
To create new neural pathways and strengthen the brain, it’s critical for people
 to continually incorporate new experiences and information into their lives. At first, these moments might feel useless, but eventually, you will find yourself looking forward to quiet moments alone.

Visit New Places
Whether this means studying in a new coffee shop, taking a different route to work, or travelling
 to a different country, displacement is good for the brain. This might be difficult to recognize
in the moment since it usually feels rather awkward – at least initially.
At the coffee shop, you can’t order the “usual.”
You have to study a new menu, pick something you have never tried before, and make a decision.
While this seems simple, people enjoy the comfort of habit. We like to know what to expect
at all times. When you travel to a new country, the language is strange, the customs are unfamiliar, and the culture presents a strange new rhythm of life. Adjusting to these new elements
forces the brain to tackle new, unexpected challenges. Learning how to communicate through
a language barrier forces the brain to develop creative ways to express needs and emotions. Listening to new music, trying new foods, and navigating foreign streets
 all work to challenge your brain’s capacity to adapt to new situations.

Continue Your Education
Adult education is one of the best investments of time, money, and energy you can make.
While education is valuable throughout childhood and adolescence, adults often underestimate their ability to learn new concepts and skills. Challenge yourself to take a class, academic or creative. Voluntarily choosing to continue education provides a perfect opportunity for your brain 
to create new connections and build higher intelligence.

Read and Watch the News
This is one activity that maintains the appearance of habit while nurturing healthy brain waves. Setting aside half an hour every morning or evening to read a newspaper or watch the news
will help your brain stay active. Digesting new information is a good daily habit. The news introduces interesting topics to consider, and will leave your brain churning with new information.

Read Books
Reading is the most basic way to facilitate brain activity, but it often presents some of the most diverse opportunities for stretching brain capacity. Reading provides practical assistance
by introducing new vocabulary, presenting examples of proper grammar usage, and showing
the elegance of a well-written sentence. However, this is only half of the magic of reading.
Whether you choose fiction, non-fiction, historical literature, or poetry, reading offers
an opportunity for the reader to make big-picture connections between the literature and real life. 
In this way, reading is an alternative way to make your brain travel to a new place.
As your imagination works to create tangible people, places, and experiences from the words
on the page, your brain is rewiring to understand all the new information.

Approach Work in New Ways
The workplace is a canvas for new experiences. Regardless of what type of job you might hold, everyone is at one time or another presented with opportunities to think outside the box,
problem solve in a creative way, and contribute fresh ideas to the team.
Instead of stressing over each new problem, it’s important to relax
and starting imagining alternatives for reaching an end goal.

Challenging Yourself
Like a weightlifter who develops muscles, one must exercise the brain on a daily basis,
pushing it just beyond its current capabilities. As Albert Einstein once said, 
“One should not pursue goals that are easily achieved. 
One must develop an instinct for what one can just barely achieve through one’s greatest efforts.”
This quote encapsulates what I believe about the brain. With enough focus and stretching,
the brain can truly surprise people. Underestimating yourself holds you back from success. When people begin believing in their abilities, they often go beyond what they thought was possible.

Brain Train
Organizations like Lumosity offer fantastic daily brain training. With puzzles and games designed to increase neuroplasticity, Lumosity was created to challenge the brain to make new connections.
A group of neuroscientists at University of California Berkeley developed this program to provide stimuli for the brain to push it to adapt and re-train itself in uncharted territory.
Success stories abound concerning the results of this public experiment.

Ask 5 Whys When Encountering Problems
One of the most standard problem solving solutions, the 5 whys still provide a solid start
to uncovering the root of a problem. Asking a question gets the brain working to find an answer. Instead of worrying about the problem, always start by asking why.

Eschew Technology to Keep the Brain in Shape
Technology does wonders for the modern world, but in some ways, technological dependence stunts the brain’s capacity for problem solving, adapting to new environments,
and being a reliable resource for practical things like simple mathematics and navigation.
Try going on a trip without a GPS. Work a few algebra problems without a calculator.
Make your brain work for you; you’ll see the results.

Fostering Creativity
Finger-painting in preschool was not only a fun activity; it helped open up the mind to
new possibilities and ways of solving problems. An artistic mindset creates new opportunities
to find new solutions, fresh inspiration, and peaceful confidence.
The blend of these elements in both personal and professional environments allows ordinary people to shine by becoming an innovative thinker and inventive leader.
Find ways to incorporate creativity into the dull grind of daily tasks.
Draw
You don’t have to be an artist to appreciate the benefits of drawing, which cultivates brain activity
in a unique way. In addition to nurturing basic hand-eye coordination, it sends synapses
to neurotransmitters to help more permanently and vividly store your memories. From doodles
on a piece of scrap paper to charcoal portraits, drawing is a healthy brain activity for everyone.
Paint
Painting is an extension of drawing. It feeds the same areas of the brain, but unlike drawing, painting often introduces new and unfamiliar textures and colors to stimulate the brain.
Painters often have a keen sense of awareness towards their surroundings.
Engaging in painting encourages people to notice minute details of the world around them.
Focusing the brain in this manner brings a heightened state of alertness.

Play an Instrument
Learning to play an instrument also has outstanding benefits for the brain. Hand-eye coordination, memory, concentration, and mathematic skills all improve through playing an instrument.
While some are more challenging to learn than others, any instrument facilitates
increased and improved cognitive functioning.
From training your fingers to master complex musical passages on the piano to counting the beats in a musical measure, instruments force various regions of the brain to work together to create music.

Write
Like reading, writing encourages vocabulary growth, grammar skills, and use of proper syntax. Writing helps the brain store information more effectively and fosters better memory skills.
Studies show that students who regularly take handwritten notes during college classes consistently score better on tests. Writing forces a person to pay attention to their memories, experiences,
and internal dialogues – a combination that increases brain function altogether.

Role-Play
Put yourself in someone else’s shoes, and your brain starts to rewire to help you think
like a different person. For those struggling to form creative ideas, role-playing can help
the wheels start turning in the brain to help develop unique solutions for difficult problems.

Working with Others
Although logical intelligence is important, emotional intelligence plays an equally vital part
in overall success. Interacting with others helps people expand beyond their own limited thinking, gain new ideas, and see things from a different perspective.
People are challenging. Smart people often enjoy isolation because it protects them from
being critical of others. However, this discomfort is necessary for truly smart people because
it pushes them outside their bubble. When you start to believe you have all the right answers,
start collaborating with others to expand perspective.

Teach and Share Information with Others
Whether this is achieved virtually or face-to-face, pursue colleagues and peers to share experience and wisdom. Fresh faces and new ideas spur inspiration and create an amplified learning environment for the brain. By creating a network for sharing ideas, your brain starts developing
a new network for formulating and executing innovative concepts.

Talk to Interesting People
No two people share the same life experiences. Everyone interprets information uniquely,
stores memories differently, and digests daily life with their own intellectual flare.
This makes collaboration a necessity for brain health. Although we are all inclined to think
our method is the best approach, gaining perspective from another person helps our brain consider new solutions and new techniques for both personal and professional issues.
Whether the conversation is centered on religion, finances, politics, or diet trends,
people should practice being a good listener. Silencing your own thoughts while the other person speaks is often challenging, but the brain needs discipline to stay sharp.

Work in a Team Environment
Collaborative environments are essential for enhancing brain activity.
Some people who enjoy working independently dread the moment when they are forced
to participate in a team-focused workplace. However, these independent individuals
are highly intelligent and can benefit the most from a little teamwork.
Author Steve Johnson’s book, Where Good Ideas Come From, focuses on the benefits
of collaborating with peers and coworkers to develop original ideas and effective strategies
for their execution. The modern workplace continues to shift towards this team-oriented approach.

Cultivating Physical Health
The body feeds the brain, and keeping oneself in top physical condition is crucial to adequate 
fueling and operation of the brain. Lack of motivation, mental fatigue, and absence of inspiration
are typically connected to poor exercise, diet, and focus.

Exercise
Studies constantly show people who exercise regularly have higher I.Q. scores. In addition to maintaining a strong body, people who exercise regularly actually stimulate brain cell growth.
A process called neurogenesis occurs during rigorous exercise, which increases the production
of neurotransmitters. With side effects like increased dopamine, active people enjoy less stress, better concentration, and more energy.
Dr. Michael Nilsson of Sahlgrenska Academy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital
in Sweden conducted extensive research on the topic. “Being fit means that you also have
a good heart and lung capacity and that your brain gets plenty of oxygen,” the doctor said.
His research focused on over a million Swedish military men, and
Dr. Nilsson found a direct correlation between physical fitness and high scores on I.Q. tests.

Pursue Athletics
Multiple studies have shown active children typically do better in school and have a better chance
of continuing their education after high school graduation. Although athletic pursuits can feel grueling at the time, the overall benefits of intense physical activity are wise for your future.
Whether it’s finding one thing you are good at, like basketball, running, or lifting weights, or trying something new every day, maintaining an athletic routine is important for optimal brain health.

Meditate
Controlling and calming the brain is as powerful as enhancing activity through instruments
and puzzles. Doctors have been studying the effects of mediation on the brain for several years,
and the results are impressive. In one famous study, Dr. Richard Davidson of the University of Wisconsin collaborated with the Dalai Lama to study what happens to the brain during meditation.
Transcendental Meditation yields impressive results for the brain. People who struggle with fear, anxiety, depression, and other mental ailments should experiment with meditation
to calm themselves and develop a stronger sense of focus.

Maintain a Nutritious Diet
Children and adults interested in boosting brain activity should begin by transforming their diet. Research from the University of Bristol in England points to a strong connection between
unhealthy diet and low I.Q. scores in children. To begin reversing unhealthy tendencies, try cutting out excess fat, sugar, and fast foods, and start adding more vegetables, fruit, and lean meats.
There are also a number of unusual drinks proven to help brain function. Matcha Green Tea,
Raw Cacao hot chocolate, and Gingko Biloba tea all show benefits for the brain.
Some scientist claim Gingko Biloba helps pump more blood to the brain, improving circulation.

Active Learning
Start children young with interactive video games, jump roping, juggling, and other activities
to feed brain stimulation. Assign a musical instrument, a physical activity, or a Sudoku puzzle
to get their brains moving. Parents, remember to join in the fun!
Creating daily routines to promote healthy brain activity doesn’t require the advice
 of a neuroscientist. While plenty of studies provide convincing evidence,
increasing brain activity can be accomplished with a few basic steps. Be intentional about your time and energy to start working towards a smarter and more fulfilling life.
http://www.lifehack.org/articles/work/you-these-20-things-every-day-youll-become-smarter.html

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
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Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com   gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
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To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”