Sunday, 16 April 2017

IELTS Reading Tips: True False Not Given

Iris



Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com  gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com                       development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Monday, 10 April 2017

5 Study Habits You Should Be Practicing

Perennial cornflower

5 Study Habits You Should Be Practicing
Alexia Bullard

With exams, quizzes, essays, projects, and myriad deadlines for different things,
effective study habits are critical for keeping stress at bay during college.
Having these great study habits can make things easier and alleviate some of the stress looming overhead. If you are in need of a bit of an improvement, or just want to get some new ideas,
keep reading for the top five study habits that you should be practicing.

1. Make and use flashcards.
Flashcards are designed to promote active memory recall of information.
By using flashcards with a question or term on one side and the answer or definition on the other, you will force your brain to recall the necessary information.
Even if you struggle a bit with a card, you will still be actively reviewing the necessary material.
One of the other reasons why flashcards are effective is that they utilize spaced repetition learning techniques. Spaced repetition has been proven time and time again to be one of the most
effective ways of building up memory and increasing recall of information.
By studying the information again and again, at spaced intervals,
you will be able to recall the information faster and far more easily.

2. Revise, revise, revise!
Many students put off studying until just before the exam, with the more diligent students
giving themselves a week or two prior to a test. While this may sound effective
and like a good manner of planning, it’s actually an ineffective method of preparing and studying.
It’s best to revise the information a little bit every day,
so that you are not overwhelmed when a test (or pop quiz!) comes around.
One method of revising is to make a mind-map. This is a bit like a flowchart,
in that you start with one core concept in the center, and then branch off into connected sections.
This will help you to connect everything together and associate the terms with one another. When it comes time to take the exam, you will be better prepared and the key terms will jump out at you.
Read aloud to yourself and, as silly as it may seem, pretend you are teaching a student.
Read your notes aloud, pretend you are lecturing. Do this over and over,
until you no longer have to look at your notes. Once you have accomplished that, do it again.
Take one of the main concepts and turn it into a little story. Make sure you are able to explain this concept, no matter how complex it actually is, to someone who has never heard of it before.
For example, if you are studying the industrial revolution, write a story that is written in such a way that it would explain that concept and events to someone who has never heard of it before.
While this may sound silly and tedious, it’s an incredibly effective means of going over the information and looking at it in a new light. This, in turn, creates new associations and gives your brain a visual representation of the information, thereby making it easier to remember and recall.
Finally, come up with a keywords list. Take each of the main concepts for the subject
you are studying, and reduce it into a ONE-word sub-topic. Study this list and memorize it. Incorporate it into the above methods, especially when using your flashcards. When it comes time for the exam, write down your list of keywords the moment you have that test in front of you.
This will ensure you easily remember each topic and sub-topic,
as well as providing a frame of reference if you get a blank during the test.

3. Watch related lectures and videos.
One of the most effective—and the most fun—methods of studying is to watch related lectures
and videos in order to supplement the material. Watch documentaries or videos on YouTube
and educational websites. You may be surprised at how much you can learn from videos,
and just how much information is available online.
On a related note, you may also be able to download or stream podcasts that cover a large range
of topics. Depending on what you are studying, you may find this to be very useful and entertaining.

4. Create practice tests based off previous tests.
You should save all of the graded papers, quizzes, tests, assignments, and handouts
that your teacher hands back to you. This will not only show you how well you did, but it will
also highlight what you need to work on and where your strengths lie in that particular subject.
You will also be able to learn the format of the tests, the structure of the questions,
and whether or not to predict the inclusion of tricky True/False questions.
Use these graded tests to create a new practice test. Include the questions you got correct,
for some variety, but mainly focus on the questions you answered incorrectly. By focusing solely
on these parts of the required material, you will turn your weaknesses around and even out
the dents in your recall. Come test time, you will be far less stressed and feel more prepared.
                                                                                                                                                            
5. Re-write your notes.
Studies have shown that writing information out by hand increases your ability to recall the material. This makes the recall go hand-in-hand with muscle memory,
and you will be able to picture your written notes when you are taking the exam.
One of the best ways to do this is to prepare for each class far ahead of time. Before the lecture begins, stake out your spot and go back over the assigned reading, your notes from the last class, and any homework you completed the night before. Right before the lecture starts, scan through
the notes from the previous lecture as a means of gaining a sense of context that you will be able
to build the new material on. This way, you will be able to focus on the lecture in order to get the information you will not be able to just look up in the book later on after the class has ended.
When you take the notes, write the information in your words rather than just blindly writing down what the professor says. This will help you to better grasp and retain the information.
After class, re-write your notes in a more organized manner. This will help you to go over
the information, as well as to ensure you have a solid set of notes for studying later on.
As you go through the notes, summarize each section.
This will sum it all up in your own vernacular, and show that you truly do understand the concepts.
It will also show where any gaps in your understanding of the material may be.
Using outline formats with bullets, indentations, and numbering in order to make the hierarchical relationship between different points even more obvious will further solidify the information in your mind. Leaving space between the lines will also makes your notes easier to scan and study later on.
The Cornell method is also extremely effective, especially if you do the summary at the end
of the page. Fold your paper to have a large section on the right, and a smaller section on the left. On the right, jot down the pertinent information, points, or definitions during class.
On the left, write questions for the information on the right, as you would read on a test.
The left section is also the place for terms that are defined by the information on the right.
At the very bottom of each page, add a summary of the above information.
Later, when you go to study the notes, you can cover up the right column
and make your notes a great means of preparing for exams.

These are the five most effective study habits, and something all successful students do.
Make sure you are on top of your game by following these study methods!

http://www.lifehack.org/284599/5-study-habits-you-should-practicing

Turbo Charged Reading: Readmore>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com                          gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com                         development, growth, management. 

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Tuesday, 4 April 2017

5 Bad Study Habits You’ve Probably Been Following

Wild plum.

5 Bad Study Habits You’ve Probably Been Following
Tom Miller

You hear a lot of platitudes when it comes to studying: “Make studying a priority.
Review your notes early and often.” “Read all the textbook chapters
and do your homework.” “Practice makes perfect. So practice as much as you can.”
First off, all the students who have ever been in a classroom just collectively rolled their eyes. Second, most of this stuff we hear, though well intentioned (maybe), is just plain wrong.
A lot of bad study habits are spread in the guise of helpful advice.
Here are 5 of the most common bad study habits that parents, teachers, and advisors teach,
and why they’re actually hurting your GPA:

1. Read the chapter before lecture
Here’s something we’ve all heard teachers say at the end of class: 
“Read chapter 12 on the Law of Cosines before class tomorrow so that we can jump right in.”
And you probably wanted to say, “Wait a sec… isn’t that your job?”
Anyway, no one does it (except maybe that guy who always sits in the front row). Even if we tell ourselves we’re gonna “get organized” and prepare before lecture, no one ever does the reading. And if you do, it’s usually a lackluster skim effort.
But would it actually help if we did?
Should we actually care about “getting organized” and doing the reading before class?
Research suggests that this is a waste. An initial review period is necessary to learn something new, but further review becomes less and less effective.
So why would you review something twice?
Well, because repetition improves your ability to recall something later. Practice makes perfect.
Not so fast. While it is useful to get a quick “lay of the land” on a new concept
before going into lecture completely cold, beyond an initial introductory period to a new concept, your ability to remember, recall, and use that information does not improve with review.
What you need instead is testing and use. So that valuable time before lecture is much better spent quizzing yourself on the information from the previous lecture. Stuff that you’ll eventually see
on the midterm or final, rather than some arcane explanation from a textbook.
Use the lecture the way it was intended: to introduce you to new material.

2. Get a study buddy
As you walk through your campus library, you see them everywhere: books scattered across tables, empty energy drink cans, and problems scribbled on pieces of paper or whiteboards.
Study groups.
Some people can’t stand to sit with other students for hours on end racking their brain
over chemical reactions or Freudian psychology, but others can’t get enough of it
and seem to find any excuse to meet up and “go over” the latest lecture notes.
So who’s got it right?
Studying with someone else can help you stay accountable, but that’s pretty much all it can do. 
Yes, knowing someone is waiting for you at 4pm at the library is motivation enough to get your butt out the door, and crack that notebook that otherwise would stay on the floor
in the corner of your dorm room. But doing practice problems with another person is the quickest way to fool yourself into thinking you can reproduce it yourself on an exam.
It’s one thing to watch someone solve a tough physics problem and nod along saying “oh yeah,
got it.” But it’s a completely different thing to actually reproduce that problem-solving method during crunch time, staring at a blank sheet of paper.
So definitely still make friends in your classes, and keep each other accountable.
But limit working on problem sets together to those couple of sticking points
you still have after working through everything yourself. Then go back a day or two later and make sure you truly understand it well enough to reproduce it yourself.

3. Review your notes after class
Passive review of your notes is not only time-consuming, it’s also been shown to be completely ineffective. And yet, this is what most teachers recommend. It’s what “good students” do.
But as with habit #1, this robotic type of study is not suited to the way the human memory system stores new information. Again, it’s far more effective to test yourself instead.
Try to re-create the key concepts or solve a few practice problems
without referring to your notes from class. Do this again a day or two later.
Studies have shown that this self-testing method is a much better use of your time than simply “refreshing” a dead page of text. The only time you should touch your notes is when you’re going
to try and re-organize and consolidate them into a more simple and compact form.

4. Find a quiet space and make it a daily habit
“Turn off the music! How can you concentrate with that on?”
“Stay still and be quiet. Just sit down and focus.”
Sound familiar?
This motherly advice is typically in response to multitasking teenagers who text, listen to music,
have Facebook open, and are Skyping with a classmate while doing their homework.
So yes, in that case they may have a point.
But the other extreme actually may be detrimental to future performance on exams.
Routinely studying in exactly the same quiet place is the best way to ensure that you can only recall that information reliably in that one spot. In essence, you’re training yourself to completely
blank on that information when test day comes, when you’re thrown into an anxious mental state, under time pressure and sitting in a foreign environment (unless you happen to have one of those chairs in your apartment with the desk so small you can barely fit a piece of paper on it).
What you should actually do: study in widely varying contexts.
Studies have show that learning new information in different environments,
at varying noise levels and even mood states,
can significantly improve your ability to recall that same information when test day comes.
So mix it up. Quiz yourself on the treadmill. Lecture your roommate while playing Call of Duty.
Do practice problems standing on one foot, using a fountain pen, while listening to ACDC.
And even better: go to the classroom where the exam will be held, pick out your seat,
and do a practice exam in the same exact amount of time allotted for the test.
Now that’s context-specific learning.

5. Refresh topics in your memory often
“If I can just keep reciting my study sheet for the next 24 hours,
I’ll have it on the tip of my tongue during the exam.”
The problem with always feeling like you’re on top a new concept is that you’re committing what psychologists call the “fluency illusion.” Just because it’s easy to recall piece of information now, does not mean you won’t forget it later.
And in fact, the easier it is to recall,
the less likely it is that you will be able to remember it in crunch time.
Studies show that some level of forgetting is actually necessary in order to improve the “retrieval strength” of a new memory. Bjork’s study recommends looking for a level of “desirable difficulty” with learning new information—e.g. it should be hard to remember how to solve limits
using L’Hopital’s Rule if you really want to make sure you can remember it on test day.
So do this: Learn it once during lecture.
Then give yourself a self-test later that night, without referencing your notes.
Then wait two days. You’ll feel like you’ve forgotten everything.
But resist the urge to study your notes again.
Instead, test yourself again and struggle through, trying to pull as much of the material as you can from the depths of your memory. Each piece of information you can recall becomes more and more bulletproof to forgetting on the exam. And even wrong answers have been shown to benefit you.
Then, and only then, go back to your notes and see where you were right and where you were wrong. Make the appropriate corrections and then repeat the process.

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/5-bad-study-habits-youve-probably-been-following.html

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com   gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
 www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”   

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

10 Ways To Organize Your Thoughts and Never Lose Ideas Again

Reflections.

10 Ways To Organize Your Thoughts and Never Lose Ideas Again
Daniel Wallen

Have you ever experienced a burst of inspiration so brilliant that you couldn’t resist proclaiming, “Eureka!” ? These light-bulb moments are an amazing thing to experience
but they are a moot point if you forget about your idea before you have the chance to act on it.
Keep reading to check out ten ways to organize your thoughts and never lose ideas again.

1. Keep a notebook in your car
If you have a pen and paper in your car at all times, you’ll be able to make a mad dash
to your vehicle to write down your thoughts before they vanish no matter where you are.

2. Type a text
On-the-go and hit with a flourish of an idea? Grab your phone and send a quick message
to yourself of the key points just in case you need to jog your memory later.

3. Call a friend
Surely you have a friend who you tell everything to, right? Let’s say you’re driving your car,
a situation where texting and writing obviously aren’t smart things to do. I would encourage to keep your call short so you can focus on the road, but dial up your friend and exclaim, “you’ll never believe the amazing thing I just thought of!” Tell them all about it, ask for their input just in case
they have any ideas that would make it even better. Saying your idea out loud will make it much less likely you will forget, and you can always call your friend later if you need a reminder.
This is just a little bit illegal in the UK if you are holding your mobile.

4. Address an email to yourself
If you’re at the office and have a cluttered desk where an idea on paper would quickly get lost
in the shuffle, you could send an email to your personal account
so you’ll have access to your idea as soon as you get home.

5. Keep a pen and paper on your bedside table
Have you ever woke up in a daze with a vivid memory of a fascinating dream that vanished
within one minute of your feet hitting the ground? Avoid forgetting your dreams by writing them down as soon as you stir awake. Since dreams tend to speak about who we are on a deep level,
you can use them to fine inspiration for ideas in the real world.

6. Compile your ideas in one place
The first five points will help you grab a fleeting idea before it runs away, but if you’re a busy person who has a lot of stuff to do, you’ll need to take a moment to compile all of your ideas
in a single place. No matter which methods you use–text, email, notebook, recording, or whatever the case may be– open a spreadsheet or document to compile your ideas in a single location.

7. Organize your ideas by topic
Now that your ideas are compiled, let’s organize them in a way that makes sense.
Our brains are full of thoughts about a limitless variety of things,
so let’s filter them by topic so you don’t get overwhelmed.
You could use categories such as Things to Write About, Books to Read, Places to Visit, etc.

8. Cut the losers
Not all ideas are created equally.
 While something might have sounded like a great idea at the time, it could look silly in retrospect. Go ahead and delete the losers so you will be more likely to act on the winners.

9. Make them actionable
The best idea in the world is of no use if you don’t take action to make it reality.
 Look at your list of ideas and ask yourself the following questions:
How can I make this relevant to my daily life?
Which ideas would be most beneficial for me to act on today?
Is there a common theme emerging here?
If so, how could I combine these ideas together to make them more powerful?
If you have a hard time getting yourself to take action

10. Boost your health
A healthy and well-rested body is more capable of retaining information than an unhealthy
and exhausted one. Make sure you exercise at least three days a week, eat your fruits and veggies and get a good night of sleep.

What do you think?
Have you ever had a glorious flash of inspiration that escaped
before you could do anything about it? Isn’t that the most frustrating thing in the world?
It happens to the best of us but if you put these ten steps into action you will never lose ideas again.

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/10-ways-organize-your-thoughts-and-never-lose-ideas-again.html

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneously recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com   gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.
To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.

Wednesday, 22 March 2017

IELTS 3 Reading Strategies

Vibrant sea evening.


Is the IELTS Reading section very challenging for you?
Can't finish all the readings and questions before the time is up?

In this lesson, you will learn three approaches to the IELTS Reading section and their pros and cons. The goal of this lesson is to help you finish the test on time without compromising your
understanding of the readings. Learn how to read less while answering more questions correctly.  After watching, make sure to do the quiz to test your understanding. Good luck on your test!
http://www.engvid.com/ielts-3-reading...
http://www.GoodLuckIELTS.com/

TRANSCRIPT
Hi again. Welcome back to www.engvid.com.
I'm Adam. Today's lesson is about IELTS. As usual, with IELTS lessons,
I will be speaking a little bit faster than normal. It's good for your listening practice. But if you're not taking the IELTS, you can still listen and try to follow us as we go through this section.

So, let's begin. Today, I'm going to look at the IELTS reading section.
I'm going to look at three different approaches to tackling the IELTS reading section.
Students always ask me: "What should I do with the reading? How do I do it? How can I finish 
on time? How can I answer more questions?" Right? So I'm going to give you three approaches,
three different ways to try to do the IELTS. Okay? We're going to look at three different ways. They're completely different from each other.

The most important thing I want to tell you before we start: you have to know what works
for you. Okay? One of these approaches will work for you; the others may not. Practice all three. If you're comfortable with one and it seems to work for you, and your score seems to be getting better, stick with that one and practice that one. Don't try to do all three each time.

Figure out which one works, and just practice that one the most. Okay?
The most obvious one and the first one we're going to talk about: read the entire passage,
and then tackle the questions. Now, a few things to say, good and bad, about this approach.

So, you have 20 minutes, let's say, that you're going to start from the first passage, you're going to do about 17 minutes; the second passage, you're going to spend 20 minutes; the last passage, you're going to spend 23, 24, 25 minutes. So, you have to do this very fast.

So: can you read the entire passage and do the questions in that timeframe? Okay?
That's the question you must ask yourself. Are you a fast reader?
Can you comprehend everything you're reading? How is your vocabulary? Things like this.
Some people, they must read everything, from beginning to end, and then go to the questions. 
But they can also keep; they can retain the information they've read,
so when they go to the questions, they know where to go back and look for the answers.

Now, the good part about this is that you have all the information in your head once you've read the entire passage. The bad part is that you're going to be reading the passage twice. Okay?
Or not the whole passage, but you're going to read big chunks of the passage twice.
You'll have read it the first time, you'll go to the questions, and then you'll be reading again
to find the answers, because you're looking for specific words now. When you get to the questions, sometimes it's only one word difference from what you read in the passage.

So, do I recommend this? Yes and no. If you're a fast reader and you can comprehend,
then yes, do that. If you're not a fast reader, then no, don't do this.
You'll be wasting too much time and reading more than you need to.
What I'm going to do with these two approaches is show you how to read less.
So you don't need to read the entire passage;
you just need to read the areas that contain the answers to the questions.
So, the second approach: go straight to the questions. You look at the question. First of all, understand the type of the question. Is it a multiple choice? Is it a fill-in-the-blank, like a summary? Are you looking for like headings for each paragraph? Are you looking for the title? Etc. Figure out what you're looking for, read the question carefully, pick out the keywords in the question or the key idea in the question, and then scan the passage. Don't read the passage.
Just quickly look everywhere for where that information ought to be.

Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR music, poetry or self development material for internal knowing.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com  gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Thursday, 16 March 2017

When You Start To Read More, These 10 Things Will Happen

Field scabious.
When You Start To Read More, These 10 Things Will Happen
Annie Mueller

I have a confession. I’m an addict.
It’s almost a lifelong thing, really. Since I was a kid. I should be embarrassed… but I’m not.
I should get help… but I won’t.
I’ll just go back to the bookstore. Back to the library. Back to my endless queue of ebooks.
Back to my stuffed shelves.
They know me. They love me. I’ve got everything I need here. Why would I stop?
And why wouldn’t you start? When you read more, life expands. Here’s how.

1. You will find a safe way to escape when your own life is depressing, overwhelming, 
or just boring.
No need to turn to drugs or alcohol. Save your money. Get a library card, or start downloading
some of those thousands of ebooks in the public domain. Get wrapped up in a story.
Get lost in another world. Get into a character’s head and out of your own.
It’s instant. It’s economical. It’s portable: your own personal escape route
when things get to be too much.
And who’s going to look down on you for reading a book? You smart thing, you.
I won’t tell them what’s really going on. Promise.

2. You find out that you have a family.
Okay, I know. You have parents and maybe siblings, and maybe a whole slew of aunts and uncles and cousins and grandparents and whatnot.
Or maybe not.
Maybe you do feel alone in the world, bereft.
Whether you’re a literal orphan or you simply feel like you totally don’t fit into the family you’ve got, becoming an avid reader is a way to find the family you can fit into.
It’s a worldwide, totally open, and really awesome family.
It’s the family of readers. Book lovers. Literary addicts. Bibliophiles. Become one of us,
and you have an extended family that you can find anywhere. There’s a signal, of course,
like a secret family handshake. Just pull out that latest book and read it. That’s all it takes.
We’ll see you.
We’ll know.
We’re always nearby, whenever you need us.

3. You will become part of a timeless, global conversation.
Books are the way that the past communicates with us. And books are the way that we communicate across cultures and national boundaries, across social lines and class divisions.
Books let us enter into each other’s lives and worlds in a completely unobtrusive but immersive way.
Yeah, it’s pretty awesome.
Have you ever wanted to be someone else, to go somewhere else, 
to experience some other life than the one you got?
Books, baby. What are you waiting for?

4. You will learn to talk pretty.
Reading is the most painless way to improve your vocabulary, spelling, and grammatical proficiency.
Did you catch how I just spelled “proficiency” without even looking it up?
Yeah. That comes from reading.
Read more, and you’ll be able to snicker smugly when your friends post status updates
with egregious spelling errors. You can correct their misuse of common words.
You can be the Grammatical Tyrant you’ve always dreamed of being.

5. You will look forward to lines, layovers, and waiting rooms.
This could be the biggest turning point of your life, actually. Instead of tapping your foot impatiently, huffing and sighing like dyspeptic cow, or otherwise displaying your wrath and frustration
 in a socially acceptable way, you can simply… read.
Whatever book you’re currently lost in should be with you, in your pocket or purse.
Pull it out and you’ve got entertainment, companionship, and intellectual stimulation.
All in one handy portable package.
My friend Leigh says that reading gives her “the ability to be happy anytime, anywhere,
even when waiting ridiculously long amounts of time.”
That’s a superpower everybody needs.

6. You will be a nicer person.
You might not care about being a nicer person, but the other people in your life probably do care.
Reading, as my friend Christine put it, “allows me to experience another’s emotions,
which in turn makes me more sensitive to those around me.”
And she’s right.
Maybe you’ve never been a victim of racism, abuse, or poverty. Maybe you don’t know
what unrequited love feels like. Maybe you find it easier to criticize than to sympathize.
Reading won’t take that away entirely (my Criticize-O-Meter is still in good working order,
even after decades as an avid reader) but it will help you to slow down a little bit on the judging.
And speed up a lot on the empathizing.
Because when you live other lives through books, you begin to see the other lives happening
in the world around you. The lives you know nothing about.
And you begin to have a little more understanding. A little more interest.
A little less “us versus them” and a lot more “we’re all in this together.”

7. You will learn stuff.
Even if all you read is fiction, you can learn quite a lot about cultural influence, relationships, history, fear, human psychology, the various expressions of spirituality, the effects of war, the way robots will definitely take over the world, and how superheroes manage to keep their capes clean.
All very useful information.
Want more? Branch out into non-fiction. Biographies, history, current events. No, just kidding; skip the books on current events. Read history instead; you’ll learn more about current events that way.
Philosophy. Psychology. How-to books. Memoirs. Science. Exploration. If you’re interested in it,
you can find a book about it. Probably you can find an entire section of books about it.
And hey, if you can’t find a book about it, maybe you should write one.

8. You will discover that you were dumber than you knew.
In the time prior to your avid reading addiction (also known as
“The Years Which Must Not Be Named”), you thought you had a pretty open mind, didn’t you?
Go ahead, you can admit it. I won’t laugh.
You thought that you knew kind of a lot, and that you had a broad perspective on life,
and a pretty accurate view on the world and how things worked.
And then you started reading.
Maybe the first few books weren’t such a big deal. They probably kept you safely in your comfort zone. But then one of the members of your new reading family gave you a recommendation.
“You’ve got to read this,” she said. “It’s so great. Really.”
So you did.
And you realized that something you thought you knew—really knew, truly and certainly—
was not right at all. You felt the edges along your mind begin to crack open a little bit.
You felt a little light seeping in and you started seeing the interior of your mind the way it really was: dim, dusty, and crowded with a lot of assumptions.
You kept reading, and the more you read, the more those cracks opened up. One by one,
those assumptions slipped and slid out of the cracks. The light grew. The air cleared.
You started populating your mind with different things: images, conversations, perceptions, insights, data. Poetry. Fragments of lives you didn’t live, but somehow experienced through a book.
Emotions that didn’t belong to you, but that you felt just as strongly.
Real things, from the real world, instead of that crumbly old stack of assumptions and expectations.

9. You will be more creative.
As you fill your mind with fresh material from all these books,
something wonderful starts happening.
Your mind wakes up.
Creativity is really all about making connections. The creative people in life, the ones we admire
for their ingenuity, are the ones who can make those connections really well. They have a broad database of knowledge, and they don’t bother keeping the categories separate.
They let poetry seep into science. They let faith and history hang out together.
They understand, in fact, that all those categorizations are imposed. We put labels on things
so that we can feel like we understand them, but sometimes the labels are counterproductive.
Reading helps you tear the labels off.
Reading helps you to fill your mind from as many sources as you want,
and then let all of that beautiful stuff mingle and mix in anyway it wants.

10. You will become more imaginative and less afraid of being weird.
When you read books that are the product of someone else’s imagination,
 you start to trust your own imagination, and use it.
What a great idea! Using that brain, in all of its crazy, unnerving, glorious potentiality.
Reading will help you do that. If you feel like your mind is strange, start reading.
After a few runs through the world of surrealism or science fiction (or surrealistic science fiction),   you will feel like the most normal person in the world.
Who are these crazy people who come up with these weird, fantastical ideas?
Of course, you’ll want to read more. So you will. And then your own imagination will start to blend what you’ve read with the real life you’re living, and you’ll add in your own unique collection
of information, experience, education, and personality. Who knows what will result?
Don’t you want to find out?
Why don’t you have a book open yet?

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/when-you-start-read-more-these-10-things-will-happen.html

Turbo Charged ReadingRead More>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR specialist and language dictionaries that are spontaneously accessed.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube 
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com    gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
 www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.”

Friday, 10 March 2017

10 Benefits of Reading: Why You Should Read Every Day

Standing stone at Avebury UK

10 Benefits of Reading: Why You Should Read Every Day
Lana Winter-H├ębert

When was the last time you read a book, or a substantial magazine article?
Do your daily reading habits center around tweets, Facebook updates, or the directions
on your instant oatmeal packet? If you’re one of countless people who don’t make a habit
of reading regularly, you might be missing out: reading has a significant number of benefits,
and just a few benefits of reading are listed below.

1. Mental Stimulation
Studies have shown that staying mentally stimulated can slow the progress of (or possibly even prevent) Alzheimer’s and Dementia, since keeping your brain active and engaged prevents it
from losing power. Just like any other muscle in the body, the brain requires exercise
to keep it strong and healthy, so the phrase “use it or lose it” is particularly apt
when it comes to your mind. Doing puzzles and playing games such as chess 
have also been found to be helpful with cognitive stimulation.

2. Stress Reduction
No matter how much stress you have at work, in your personal relationships, or countless other issues faced in daily life, it all just slips away when you lose yourself in a great story.
A well-written novel can transport you to other realms, while an engaging article will distract you 
and keep you in the present moment, letting tensions drain away and allowing you to relax.

3. Knowledge
Everything you read fills your head with new bits of information, and you never know
when it might come in handy. The more knowledge you have, the better-equipped you are
to tackle any challenge you’ll ever face.
Additionally, here’s a bit of food for thought: should you ever find yourself in dire circumstances, remember that although you might lose everything else—your job, your possessions, your money, even your health—knowledge can never be taken from you.

4. Vocabulary Expansion
This goes with the above topic: the more you read, the more words you gain exposure to,
and they’ll inevitably make their way into your everyday vocabulary. 
Being articulate and well-spoken is of great help in any profession, and knowing that you can speak to higher-ups with self-confidence can be an enormous boost to your self-esteem.
It could even aid in your career, as those who are well-read, well-spoken, and knowledgeable
on a variety of topics tend to get promotions more quickly (and more often) than those with smaller vocabularies and lack of awareness of literature, scientific breakthroughs, and global events.
Reading books is also vital for learning new languages, as non-native speakers gain exposure
to words used in context, which will ameliorate their own speaking and writing fluency.

5. Memory Improvement
When you read a book, you have to remember an assortment of characters, their backgrounds, ambitions, history, and nuances, as well as the various arcs and sub-plots that weave
their way through every story. That’s a fair bit to remember, but brains are marvellous things
and can remember these things with relative ease. Amazingly enough, every new memory you create forges new synapses (brain pathways)and strengthens existing ones,
which assists in short-term memory recall as well as stabilizing moods. How cool is that?

6. Stronger Analytical Thinking Skills
Have you ever read an amazing mystery novel, and solved the mystery yourself
before finishing the book? If so, you were able to put critical and analytical thinking to work
by taking note of all the details provided and sorting them out to determine “whodunnit”.
That same ability to analyze details also comes in handy when it comes to critiquing the plot; determining whether it was a well-written piece, if the characters were properly developed,
if the storyline ran smoothly, etc. Should you ever have an opportunity to discuss the book
with others, you’ll be able to state your opinions clearly,
as you’ve taken the time to really consider all the aspects involved.

7. Improved Focus and Concentration
In our internet-crazed world, attention is drawn in a million different directions at once
as we multi-task through every day. In a single 5-minute span, the average person will divide
 their time between working on a task, checking email, chatting with a couple of people
(via gchat, skype, etc.), keeping an eye on twitter, monitoring their smartphone, and interacting with co-workers. This type of ADD-like behaviour causes stress levels to rise, and lowers our productivity.
When you read a book, all of your attention is focused on the story—the rest of the world
just falls away, and you can immerse yourself in every fine detail you’re absorbing.
Try reading for 15-20 minutes before work (i.e. on your morning commute, if you take public transit), and you’ll be surprised at how much more focused you are once you get to the office.

8. Better Writing Skills
This goes hand-in-hand with the expansion of your vocabulary: exposure to published,
well-written work has a noted effect on one’s own writing, as observing the cadence, fluidity,
and writing styles of other authors will invariably influence your own work. In the same way that musicians influence one another, and painters use techniques established by previous masters,
so do writers learn how to craft prose by reading the works of others.

9. Tranquillity
In addition to the relaxation that accompanies reading a good book, it’s possible that the subject
you read about can bring about immense inner peace and tranquility.
Reading spiritual texts can lower blood pressure and bring about an immense sense of calm,
 while reading self-help books has been shown to help people suffering from
certain mood disorders and mild mental illnesses.

10. Free Entertainment
Though many of us like to buy books so we can annotate them and dog-ear pages for future reference, they can be quite pricey. For low-budget entertainment, you can visit
your local library and bask in the glory of the countless tomes available there for free.
Libraries have books on every subject imaginable, and since they rotate their stock
and constantly get new books, you’ll never run out of reading materials.
If you happen to live in an area that doesn’t have a local library, or if you’re mobility-impaired
and can’t get to one easily, most libraries have their books available in PDF or ePub format
so you can read them on your e-reader, iPad, or your computer screen. There are also many sources online where you can download free e-books, so go hunting for something new to read!
There’s a reading genre for every literate person on the planet, and whether your tastes lie
in classical literature, poetry, fashion magazines, biographies, religious texts, young adult books,
self-help guides, street lit, or romance novels, there’s something out there to capture your curiosity and imagination. Step away from your computer for a little while, crack open a book,
and replenish your soul for a little while.
http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/10-benefits-reading-why-you-should-read-everyday.html


Turbo Charged Reading: Read more>>>Read fast>>>Remember more>>>Years later
Contact M’reen at: read@turbochargedreading.com

You can TCR software and engineering manuals for spontaneously recall – or pass that exam.
I can Turbo Charge Read a novel 6-7 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
I can TCR an instructional/academic book around 20 times faster and remember what I’ve read.
Introduction to Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
A practical overview of Turbo Charged Reading YouTube  
How to choose a book. A Turbo Charged Reading YouTube
Emotions when Turbo Charged Reading YouTube

Advanced Reading Skills Perhaps you’d like to join my FaceBook group ?

Perhaps you’d like to check out my sister blogs:
www.innermindworking.blogspot.com  gives many ways for you to work with the stresses of life
 www.ourbusinessminds.blogspot.com   development, growth, management. www.mreenhunthappyartaccidents.blogspot.com      just for fun.

To quote the Dr Seuss himself, “The more that you read, the more things you will know.
The more that you learn; the more places you'll go.